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51 Household: 1880 Census
Marital Father's Mother's
Name Relation Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Birthplace Birthplace
Robt. N. ALCORN Self M Male W 46 PA Farmer PA PA
Jane ALCORN Wife M Female W 45 PA Keeping House IRE IRE
Anna B. ALCORN Dau S Female W 12 PA PA PA
Jno. L. ALCORN Son S Male W 10 PA PA PA
Joseph ALCORN Son S Male W 8 PA PA PA


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Source Information:
Census Place Bell, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania
Family History Library Film 1255203
NA Film Number T9-1203
Page Number 27C  
Robert Nicolls Alcorn
 
52 Ancestral File Number: BR7P-0JMayflower passenger.

NOTE: a lot of information in this file is not proven
-Dale A. Updike 
Isaac Allerton
 
53 NOTE: a lot of information in this file is not proven
-Dale A. Updike 
Isaac Allerton
 
54 Ancestral File Number: D1S3-57 Mary ALLERTON
 
55 NOTE: a lot of information in this file is not proven
-Dale A. Updike 
Sarah Allerton
 
56 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
57 There are some who believe this Adam Ashbaugh to be John Adam Ashbaugh, a descendant of a Frederick Eschbach, different from our Johann Heinrich Eschbach. If these are correct, Frederick would have been 50 years old when this child was born. Traditions that I have received from both descendants of Johann and descendants of the Steiner families list this Adam as a descendant of Johann Heinrich and so he is included here with the realization that this information is in dispute and the listed descendants may not belong to the Johann Heinrich Eschbach family. There are some however who claim the Frederick is the brother of Johann Heinrich and if so he may be related in some other fashion.

He probably resided in Adams or York County for a time, but probably reached manhood and moved prior to a taxation list showing him. He is mentioned in his father's estate.. Reportedly in family notes he was a soldier in the War of 1812. He was an early settler of Westmoreland County,Pa. as well as Armstrong County,Pa. By 1790 he was settled in Hempfield Twp., Westmoreland Co.,PA. By 1800 he was settled in Franklin Twp. and by 1810 he was settled in Armstrong Co., PA on a site which is now Kiskiminites Twp. 
Adam Ashbaugh
 
58 maybe born in German Palinate or Philadelphia, PA
residence: Andrews Burgh, later changed to Speedwell
Marks German Reformed Church, Adams Co.
Subscribing and founding member Marks Church in 1789
Estate - recorded in Adams Co., PA

Genealogical Reports for the Historical Society of York Co., Vol.XXII, pp.30-36 (1939):
Taxables of 1783, York County, PA -
Andrew ASHBOUGH of Mount Joy Twp., 120 acres
1 house, 1 outhouse, 4 horses, 7 cows, 15 sheep
6 males, 2 females; valuation L283.12.0, tax L4.14.6

Andrew ESHBAUGH or ASHBOUGH, member of the Fifth Class of the Inhabitants of Mountjoy Township, classified under an Act of Assembly passed in 1780, entitled "An Act to compleat the Quota of the Federal Army;" each class was "required to provide, in fifteen Days from this Date [January 30, 1781], one able-bodied Recruit for the Continental Army, to serve during the War," under penalty of a fine of L15.0.0 specie: this class furnished a recruit.

Andrew owned 120 acre farm known as "Andrews Burgh" & "Speedwell" in Mountjoy Twp., Adams Co., PA. He was known as both a farmer & a potter. His estate was appraised at $1586.10. Andrew may have been born 1.) in Germany immediately before his parents emigrated to America; 2.) on board the ship; or 3.) in Philadelphia, immediately after his parents landed. Andrew ASHBOCH/ASHBOUGH appears in Mt. Joy Twp., Adams Co., PA censuses of 1800 & 1810. 
Andrew Ashbaugh
 
59 Married by Rev. F. R. Cubit in Ausable Forks, N.Y. on 22 May 1928.
Celebrated their 50th anniversary at the Windon Restaurant in
Winchendon, Mass. Guests were present from Lorain, Ohio, Shelter
Island, N.Y. and the Gardner area in observance of the occasion. Arthur is
retired from Weyerhaeser Paper Company after 31 years of service.

Arthur and Florence are buried in the Forest Hill Cemetery, Fitchburg, MA; Section J, row 17, plots 491 and 492.  
Arthur Harper Atkinson
 
60 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
61 Written by David Halbstein:

Alta Jean Barber Alcorn was widowed in 1939. She lived at the farmhouse at Alcorn's Crossroads, Bell Township, Westmoreland County, PA until 1960 or 1961, when she moved to New Jersey to live with her daughter, Anna Jean Alcorn Halbstein. She lived in New Jersey until her death in 1969.

According to oral family history, the farm had been passed down along the Alcorn family lines for generations. During Alta Jean's lifetime, the farm was owned by her father-in-law, George Edgar, and passed directly to her three children, Robert, Anna Jean, and George. Her husband was suffering from chronic Nephritis during the late 1930's; it is likely that the transfer of property was executed as such because they assumed that Robert would not outlive his father. In fact, they both died in 1939.

Robert Laurence Jr. moved to Chambersburg, but George stayed on the farm. He built a house about a half-mile away where he raised his family.

When Alta Jean moved to New Jersey, the farmhouse (circa 1835) began to fall to ruin; in the 1970's and 1980's George undertook the project of its renovation. He eventually sold the house he had built and moved into the house where he lived until his death in 1995. He cut wood from local trees and had paneling made for the different rooms; one was done in local sycamore, another in walnut, another in oak.

As of this writing (2004) his widow, Georgia Ashbaugh Alcorn lives in the house alone; her daughter Erin LaCrone is nearby with her husband, Rich.


 
Alta Jean Barber
 
62 Betty and Herbert Harmon lived in Puerto Rico. Their last known address was

(c. 1965)

S-50 Annapolta Calle
Lomas Verdes
Bayamon, Puerto Rico 00619 
Elizabeth Kettering Barber
 
63 Esther Barber Gilmore was my grandmother's sister. I remember her coming to visit us in the 1960's with Uncle Roy; my only memory of her is as a frail woman who was very hard of hearing.

Uncle Roy was a little more hale and healthy then.

During one visit when I was about ten years old, Roy Gilmore and I spent the weekend together, rigging a small sailboat that my father had built. We went back and forth from the sailing school in Long Branch where the boat was kept to "The Boatman's Shop" in Red Bank. We bought lines and pulleys, screws, cleats and other hardware and really "tricked out" the little boat, which had been christened "The Ayo Kay" (we thought my Dad was an absolute genius for coming up with that name).

On one trip, Uncle Roy had forgotten to buckle the seat belt in his rented car. As we were driving from the sailing school, he remembered the seat belt; while he was fumbling around for it on the floor of the car he took his eyes off the road and we drove into a tree. It may have been a telephone pole. No one was hurt.  
Esther Marie Barber
 
64 During the battle of Fredericksburg the 64th guarded the fords above the town on the north bank of the river. John Barber
 
65 In May, 1862, The 64th joined McDowell's column on the Rappahannock and was assigned to McCall's division Pa. reserves. Soon after it moved with its division by transport to the support of McClellan on the Peninsula, arriving at White House on June 24, where one battalion under Lieut.-Col. Kerr was detached and ordered to Yorktown, remaining there until the close of the Peninsular campaign. John Barber
 
66 John Barber fought in the Civil War.

From Alta Jean Alcorn's notes, in her own hand,

" Grandfather went at Lincoln's first call for volunteers. Twelve men, neighbors, got on their horses and rode to Washingon to answer that call. Whe Grandpa left he said he would not be gone long as it would not last long. He told Tommy, his oldest son to take care for his mother and sisters (young girls then). Ther was little or no mail received or sent. Because my grandfather came in on a horse, he was placed in the cavalry. The war was continuous battles and skirmishes. My Grandfather related many day by day experiences, some fearsome ones. But he told of one battle where cavalry ws to charge first. As they galloped past the foot-soldiers, he saw his son Tommy in the line of March. This was his first and last sight of him during the war. When he came home, after the war, he learned Tommy had run off to the war with others of the country side and his wife Rachel was alone with the girls."

In the back of her address book she kept while living with us in Oceanport, NJ, she wrote,

""At Gettysburg, enter State of Pa. Monument by steps. Go back to last pillar on left 2nd plaques. On it are 3rd Pa [Cal]vary and other, [unreadable] PA Cavalry (sic) Name of John Barber, my grandfather, [unreadable] name under Company C [unreadable] Pa. Cavalry (sic). "



John's cavalry unit "did not engage" the enemy at the battle of Gettysburg. The unit came in at the back of most of the action and remained there for the three days; they were responsible for riding to the front lines and escorting prisoners to the back; later picking up weapons and burying the dead.

John was wounded on April 15, 1864; he took cannon shrapnel to the elbow. After spending some time in the hospital, he was released at the expiration of his term. He was dicharged with a 1/2 pension for disability as a result of his wound.

According to the 1880 census; the Barbers lived next to the James B. Alcorns


 
John Barber
 
67 John's cavalry unit did not engage the enemy at the battle of Gettysburg. The unit came in at the back of most of the action and remained there for the three days; they were responsible for riding to the front lines and escorting prisoners to the back; later picking up weapons and burying the dead.  John Barber
 
68 On the 5th the 64th engaged in the pursuit of Lee, frequently skirmishing with his rear-guard. In the campaign of maneuvres which followed the march into Virginia, it was briskly engaged at Shepherdstown and suffered a heavy loss at Jeffersonton, losing in killed, wounded and prisoners about 200 men out of 375 in action. Many of the men captured here subsequently died in Andersonville prison.  John Barber
 
69 The 64th was active at Antietam, here the regiment lost its colonel, temporarily in command of the brigade on that day. Col. Childs was succeeded in command by Lieut.-Col. Kerr. While encamped on the Potomac, near Hancock, in the early fall a battalion under Capt. Duncan, crossed the river and made a sudden descent on the headquarters of the enemy's picket reserve at Hedgesville, capturing 3 officers and 20 men and winning praise from high quarters for its dashing exploit.  John Barber
 
70 The balance of the regiment proceeded to the front, arriving in time to participate in the famous Seven Days', battles of McClellan's army. The 4th suffered a loss of a few men during the night attack by the enemy on July 31, at Harrison's landing.
 
John Barber
 
71 Location of birth is not confirmed, but estimated from parents' residence at the time Thomas James Barber
 
72 Married in the parlor of her parents home in Apollo, PA at 11 AM by the reverend D.J. Davis, the Methodist minister at the time.

From Elizabeth Kettering Barber's diary, 1 Apr 1958;

"After Church, We attended a committee meeting of Lutherans in North Apollo at Mrs. A's home. All those attending were Lutherans. The lady I knew best was Mrs. Lily Ludwig. Long ago when her children were little, and not all of them were yet born, she lived on our farm; They had rented the old homestead where my deceased husband was born & raised. The night was quite cold, but clear."

NOTE:

I believe that the homestead she is talking about is the home of John and Rachel Barber, pictured under the entry for John Barber. Elizabeth and Calvin lived across the street and about a half-mile away Their farm is gone, and the land now (2007) houses a nursing home. Married in the parlor of her parents home in Apollo, PA at 11 AM by the reverend D.J. Davis, the Methodist minister at the time.  
William Calvin Orr Barber
 
73 Graduated from Penn State with a degree in Accounting. Brian is a CPA Donald Brian Bastis
 
74 Giff and Joan Grimm said that Jessie Maude Bishop came from Canada with her sisters and were Seamstresses in Boston.

There is a Jessie Bishop in the Lynn, Massachusetts 1910 Census - the census says:

Jessie Bishop, age 40, head of house hold, working as a stitcher in a shoe factory. Originally from Canada.

Alvenia Bishop, age 51 (or 57), sister of Jessie, working as a "Table Worker" in a shoe factory. Also originally from Canada.

Census says that Jessie came to the US in 1887, Alvenia in 1885.

It is unlikely that this is the same Jessie Bishop; the mother of George W. Grimm Jr. was living in NJ in 1920.  
Jessie Maud Bishop
 
75 According to Lisa Dreyer, his g-g-granddaughter, he died from wounds received in the Civil War Joseph Bouch
 
76 From Thomas Parrish, November 15, 1998:

William Bradford, the Pilgrim Governor, was left almost bereft of his natural guardians at about five years old, with the death of his father (in 1591), the remarriage of his mother (in 1593) and the death of his grandfather (1595). He inherited from his grandfather a house and about ten acres of land in Bentley-cum-Arksey, five miles from his birthplace at Austerfield and just north of Doncaster. The presumption is that he may have been broucht up with relatives at some place other than Austerfield or Bentley. This is supported by his bringing the name Wellingly, his grandfather's home, to Plymouth. He sold his inheritance in Bentley in 1611, apparently traveling to London from Leyden for the purpose.

The tradition is that William, when a young man, desired to marry Alice Carpenter. However, on account of his inferiority of rank, this was opposed by Alice's parents. Alice instead married Edward Southworth, and William married Dorothy May. Dorothy drowned in Plymouth Harbor before the landing on December 7, 1620. Edward Southworth died shortly after in England. After Edward's death, William wrote Alice offering marriage and was accepted.

Gov. Bradford's later life is well documented in many sources.  
William Bradford
 
77 Ancestral File Number: 2068-TXV
NOTE: a lot of information in this file is not proven
-Dale A. Updike 
Fear Brewster
 
78 According to family lore, Thurman was working in the fields at age 13 when he complained of a stomach ache. His father did not believe him, thinking he was only trying to get out of work. He collapsed and died of a burst appendix. Thurman T Brown
 
79 Eliza may have been born in Peru, N.Y. ELIZABETH A. Bushy
 
80 The death and burial information cited here is well documented for Andrew J Catron, who was a Sergeant in Company L, 1st Ky Calvary (Union); however, whether this Andrew J Catron is the same as Andrew Jackson Catron, son of Christian Columbus Catron is yet unproven. According to H. H. Catron's volume, "The Kettenring Family", c. 1966, Andrew Jackson Catron "died in the Civil War", so it is possible or even likely that these two are the same person.  Andrew Jackson Catron
 
81 Ancestral File Number: J53C-M0 Deborah CHURCH
 
82 Carrie's death may have taken place in South Carolina on 2 April 1926; a death certificate was filed in Charleston for Carrie B. Cochran with the same date of birth. We have no information as to how or why she may have gone to S.C.

The same information indicates that Carrie was married to Ambrose Shaver in 1890. This information is yet unproven.

On the 1900 Federal Census, Mary (Alcorn) Cochran, the children's mother, claims that all seven of her children are living.  
Carrie Belle Cochran
 
83 Elmer E. Cochran is listed in the 1930 Federal Census. His death is after this census was taken Elmer Cochran
 
84 On the 1880 Federal Census, Elmer Cochran claims to be 19 years of age.
 
Elmer Cochran
 
85 On the 1900 FC dated June 29, Gary Cochran claims to be 13 years of age George Cochran
 
86 On the 1900 Federal Census, Mary (Alcorn) Cochran, the children's mother, claims that all seven of her children are living.  George Cochran
 
87 On the 1880 Federal Census, her age is given as 6 years Hattie Cochran
 
88 On the 1900 Federal Census, Mary (Alcorn) Cochran, the children's mother, claims that all seven of her children are living.  Hattie Cochran
 
89 Jennie is claimed to be 12 years old on June 29, 1900, on the 1900 FC Jennie Cochran
 
90 On the 1900 Federal Census, Mary (Alcorn) Cochran, the children's mother, claims that all seven of her children are living.  Jennie Cochran
 
91 Name on 1900 FC is "Lizzie L." Lizzie L. Cochran
 
92 On the 1880 Federal Census, we interpreted her age as 5, but this was a transcription error that should have read 8. Lizzie Cochran is living with her parents as of the 1900 Federal Census, her birthdate is given as November, 1871 Lizzie L. Cochran
 
93 On the 1900 Federal Census, Mary (Alcorn) Cochran, the children's mother, claims that all seven of her children are living.  Lizzie L. Cochran
 
94 Minnie is living with her parents in 1900, her birthdate is given on the 1900 Federal Census Minnie Cochran
 
95 On the 1900 Federal Census, Mary (Alcorn) Cochran, the children's mother, claims that all seven of her children are living.  Minnie Cochran
 
96 Date of Death unconfirmed; taken from online family tree without citation William Cochran
 
97 Ancestral File Number: 3DS7-2P Elizabeth Royal COMBES
 
98 The date of birth is approximate; other sources list this as 1762 George William Cook
 
99 Alternate spelling KOCK Jeremiah Cook, Sr.
 
100 Edwin Stanton Spencer Jeremiah Cook, Sr.
 

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