Halbstein/Parrishgenealogypages
Halbstein and Parrish Family Tree
First Name:  Last Name: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

Notes


Tree:  

Matches 251 to 288 of 288

      «Prev «1 ... 2 3 4 5 6

   Notes   Linked to 
251 Ancestral File Number: 10JM-D1K Mary Elizabeth "Betty" TAYLOR
 
252 Ancestral File Number: 1RQW-04F Octavia Pannil TAYLOR
 
253 The marker on this map is the original home of Margaret's father, President Zachary Taylor, near Baton Rouge, La. We do not have information as to her exact burial site. Octavia Pannil TAYLOR
 
254 Ancestral File Number: 1493-52W Richard TAYLOR
 
255 Ancestral File Number: LH6H-X5


Ref: Historical Southern Families, by Boddie.
A Colonel RichardTaylor, b. March 22, 1744, m. Sarah, daughter of William Strother of this family and died in KY in 1826. He was father of President Zachary Taylor, whose daughter Sarah, was the first wife of President JeffersonDavis, CSA.

(Note: Zachary Taylor was born Nov. 24, 1784; third son of Col.Richard Taylor, a Rev. officer. In 1785 he moved from Orange Co., VA to KY which at the time was part of Virginia. He lived near the present city of Louisville, KY. Ref: The World Book, Vol. 16, Encyclopedia).

Richard came from an old Virginia family with his father, Zachary, one of the first justices of OrangeCounty in 1734 along with Robert Green, father of John, also of the First Virginia. Zachary died in 1768 and his epitaph in the Taylor Cemetery at Meadow Farm, Orange County, reads "son of James II, of Bloomsbury, Knight of the Golden Horseshoe. Grand parent of President Zachary Taylor, Great Uncle of President James Madison, Great Grand parent of Sara Knox Taylor, wife of President Jefferson Davis of the Confederacy, husband of Elizabeth Lee." Richard was born on 3 April 1744 in Orange County. He was a graduate of William and Mary, served in theVirginia Assembly, and acquired the "Hare Forest" estate in Orange County. Richard went to Williamsburg with the company of Capt. John Green as its first lieutenant. Taking command of the company in October 1776, promotion to captain came with a date of rank of 5 March 1776. May and June 1777 found him in Virginiarecruiting. The company payroll for September 1777 was signed by him and that month through the following November had him as acting regimental commander. On4 February 1778, Taylor was promoted to major, while on furlough, and transferred to the Thirteenth Regiment which on 14 September 1778 became the Ninth. On 20 August 1779, he married Sarah Dabney Strother, sixteen years his junior, andalso descended from old Virginia families. Appointment to lieutenant colonel of the Second Regiment was on 7 December 1779
and retirement on 12 February 1781. His balance of pay was collected on 24 April 1783. On
8 September 1783, land warrant 1734 awarded him 6,000 acres in the Military District of Ohio as a lieutenant colonel of the Virginia line for three year's service. He was also awarded number 5452 for eight years and two months service, in all 8,166 acres. Oftheir nine children, the third child and son, Zachary, would become President of the United States. Shortly after Zachary's birth at "Montebello", the home of a cousin, as "Hare Forest" had been sold, the mother and he and his two olderbrothers moved to Jefferson County (Kentucky) where Richard had already found the family a new home, "Springfield", near Louisville, which he built in 1785. Sarah died on 13 December 1822 and Richard on 19 January 1829. Almost to the end Richard sought his just rewards for on 12 June 1828 he was granted 450 acres for his lieutenant colonelcy which he had never received. A pension was also received on that date as he had opted for five years of full pay versus half pay for life. His accounting of his retirement was somewhat different from that provided by Gwathmey. He stated the Chesterfield Courthouse arrangement of officers arranged him as a supernumerary lieutenant colonel in the Ninth Virginia rather than a major in the Thirteenth which he was until then (M. Lee Minnis, FirstVirginia Regiment of Foot 1775-1783, 1998, pp. 386-387).

Col. Richard Taylor and his wife had several children. Their son, Zachary Taylor, Jr., was born in Orange Co, VA, in 1786, and was an officer in the U. Army, distinguishing himself during the struggle with Mexico, which service made him available to the Presidency, to which position he was elected, but the duties of his office were so taxing that he died before the expiration of his term. He married Margaret Smith and their son, Richard Taylor, was a Lieuten 
Richard TAYLOR
 
256 Ancestral File Number: LH6J-45 Richard Strother TAYLOR
 
257 Ancestral File Number: H485-40 Sarah Knox TAYLOR
 
258 Ancestral File Number: LH6J-LK Sarah Strother TAYLOR
 
259 Ancestral File Number: 1RX2-KZP William Dabney Strother TAYLOR
 
260 Name Suffix:
Name Prefix: President
Ancestral File Number: 8QS4-3B

The 12th President of the United States of America.

Born in Virginia in 1784, Zachary was taken as an infant to Kentucky and raised on a plantation. He was a career officer in the Army, but his talk was most often of cotton raising. His home was in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and he owned a plantation in Mississippi. "Old Rough and Ready's" homespun ways were political assets. His long military record would appeal to northerners; his ownership of 100 slaveswould lure southern votes. He had not committed himself on troublesome issues.But Taylor did not defend slavery or southern sectionalism; 40 years in the Army made him a strong nationalist.

He spent a quarter of a century policing the frontiers against Indians. In the Mexican War he won major victories at Monterrey and Buena Vista.

He was the first professional soldier to become President, having been elected because of his victories in the Mexican War. His presidency was brief (16 months) and his accomplishments few. He did, however, takea strong stand against Southern secession over the slavery question, though a Southerner and a landowner himself. Taylor was of English heritage and Whig political affiliation. He stood 5'8" tall and was an Episcopalian. His death came 9 July 1850 in the White House; he was buried in the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery near Louisville, KY.

After his death, the forces of compromise triumphed, but the war Taylor had been willing to face came 11 years later. In it, his only son Richard served as a general in the Confederate Army.

[William Strother 1726 Descendants.ged]

Born at the home of a friend of his father as "Hare Forest" had been sold and his father was in KY building a new home.

1810MAR: Jefferson Co, KY, 18 Jun, Zachary Taylor and Margaret Smith. Gen. O.O. Howard wrote that it took place in a little log house on the Taylor Farm about 6 miles above the city of Louisville; she came from VA (NGS Quarterly, Vol. XIII,Mar 1924, No. 1, p.10). 
Zachary Taylor
 
261 NOTE: a lot of information in this file is not proven
-Dale A. Updike 
Zachary Taylor
 
262 Abraham O. Tinstman was born Sept. 13, 1834, in East Huntingdon township, Westmoreland Co., Pa., on the farm upon which are now located the Emma Mine Coke-Works. He received his education in the common schools, attending them during the winter season until about twenty years of age, and continued laboring on the farm with his father until he became twenty-five years old, when he went to Broad Ford, Fayette Co., Pa., to take charge of his grandfather Overholt’s property at that place, the business consisting of the manufacture of the celebrated Overholt whiskey, the cutting of timber by steam saw-mill into car and other lumber, and the farming of the lands connected with the Broad Ford property. He thus continued to manage and do business for his grandfather until 1864, when the two formed a partnership, named A. Overholt & Co. He, however, continued to conduct the business until the death of his grandfather, A. Overholt, who died in 1870, in the eighty-sixth year of his age.

During Mr. Tinstman’s residence in the county and his partnership with his grandfather he caused the erection of the most important buildings in Broad Ford, some of which are the large mill and distillery now there, as well as many houses for the use of employés.

In 1865 he and Joseph Rist bought about six hundred acres of coking coal land adjoining the village of Broad Ford. Mr. Tinstman thereafter (in 1868) sold one-half of his interest in the same to Col. A. S. M. Morgan, of Pittsburgh, Pa., and with him established the firm of Morgan & Co., who put up one hundred and eleven coke-ovens at the point now known as Morgan Mines, on the line of the Mount Pleasant and Broad Ford Railroad, and built one mile of railroad from Broad Ford to said mines, at which place the first coke was manufactured along what is now the Mount Pleasant and Broad Ford Railroad. Morgan & Co. at this time held almost entire control of the coke business of the Connellsville region.

In 1870, A.O. Tinstman with others organized a company, of which he was elected president, and built the Mount Pleasant and Broad Ford Railroad, he holding the office of president until the sale of said road to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company in 1876.

About 1871, Mr. Tinstman purchased a portion of Mr. Rist’s interest in the six hundred acres of coal land previously mentioned. Mr. H.C. Frick, who was at this time keeping the books of A. Overholt & Co., was very desirous of starting in business, and aspired for something more than book-keeping, and having shown by his indomitable energy, skill, and judgment that be was not only capable of keeping an accurate and beautiful set of books, but that he was able to conduct business, manage employés, etc., Mr. Tintsman and Mr. Rist associated Mr. Frick with them, under the firm-name of Frick & Co., and made him manager of the association, etc.

This company built at Broad Ford two hundred coke-ovens. The first one hundred were built along or facing the Mount Pleasant and Broad Ford Railroad, and were known as the Frick Works, or "Novelty Works." The other hundred were built in blocks along the Pittsburgh Division of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and facing the road and Youghiogheny River, and were known as the Henry Clay Works.

In 1872, Col. Morgan and Mr. Tintsman (as Morgan & Co.) bought about four hundred acres of coking coal land at Latrobe, Westmoreland Co., Pa., and there built fifty ovens. About this period and on continuously to 1876 (during the panic period) Mr. Tintsman bought large tracts of coal lands on ‘the line of the Mount Pleasant and Broad Ford Railroad, comprising nearly all the best coal lands in that region; but the pressure of the panic proved excessive for him, the coke business, like everything else, becoming depressed, and he failed, losing everything. But having great confidence that the coke business would revive, and foreseeing that it would be one of the earliest as well as surest of manufacturing interests to recuperate, he bought in 1878 and 1880 on option a large extent of coal land in the Connellsville region, and in 1880 hold about 3500 acres at a good advance over cost price to E.K. Hyndman, who then organized the Connellsville Coal and Iron Company.

This sale enabled him again to take a new start in the world as a business man. He then, in 1880, established the firm of A.O. Tintsman & Co., and opened an office on the corner of Seventh Avenue and Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., and soon after bought a half-interest in the Rising Sun Coke-Works, on the June Bug Branch of the Southwest Pennsylvania Railroad. In 1881 he bought the Mount Braddock Coke-Works, located on the Fayette County Branch of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and Southwest Pennsylvania Railroad; and in the same year he bought the Pennsville Coke-Works, on the Southwest Pennsylvania Railroad, embracing in all about three hundred ovens, all of which he still owns and operates.

Thus we see again verified in Mr. Tinstman’s life that great truth, that those who "try again" earnestly and energetically will succeed. He is to be congratulated in his again being established in business, and being so pleasantly situated and surrounded by home and family relations, as it is well known that while in the county he labored diligently for its welfare; and though he has not received the deserved abundant recompense in a pecuniary manner, yet the people of the county appreciate his labors, especially those who have been benefited directly by the development of the coal interests of the county, and of whom there are not a few.

On July 1, 1875, Mr. Tintsman married Miss Harriet Cornelia Markle, youngest daughter of Gen. Cyrus P. Markle and Sarah Ann Markle (whose maiden name was Sarah Ann Lippincott), of Mill Grove, Westmoreland Co., Pa. He has one son, named Cyrus Painter Markle Tinstman.

from K.O.Critchfield, "Sons and Grandsons of Westmoreland County"

[Memoirs of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: Personal and Genealogical, Vol. 2; Northwestern Historical Association (1904); pp. 239-240]

ABRAHAM OVERHOLT TINSTMAN, for a quarter of a century as resident of Turtle Creek, was born in East Huntington [sic] township, Westmoreland county, in 1834. He is of German [and Swiss] descent, his [Swiss] maternal grandfather, Abraham Overholt, being one of the prominent early settlers of Westmoreland county. Abraham Overholt married Maria Stauffer, of Fayette county, and had a daughter, Anna, who was married, in 1830, to John Tinstman, father of the man whose name heads this article.

Abraham Overholt Tinstman was the third of ten children. He was educated in the common schools of his native county, worked on a farm until he reached the age of twenty-five, when he became manager of the estate of his grandfather, Abraham Overholt, the estate embracing a mill, distillery and valuable lands, at Broad Ford, Fayette Co., pa. In 1864 he became partner with his grandfather, and continued in this capacity until the death of the latter, which occurred in 1870.

Mr. Tinstman has long been extensively interested in coal and coke. In 1868 he formed a partnership with Col. A. S. M. Morgan, of Pittsburg [sic], under the name of Morgan & Co., and engaged in making coke near Broad Ford, Pa. In 1871 he formed a partnership with Messrs. Frick and Rist, under the name of Frick & Co., and continued with this concern in the manufacture of coke until 1880, when he established the firm of A. O. Tinstman & Co., in Pittsburg [sic], being engaged in the same business for some years.
Since 1885 he has dealt extensively in the purchase and sale of coal lands, his office being at No. 425 Fourth Ave., Pittsburg [sic]. In 1870 Mr. Tinstman was one of the organizers of the Mount Pleasant & Broad Ford railway company, and was president of the company until the road was purchased by the Baltimore & Ohio railroad company, six years later.

Mr. Tinstman was married, July 1, 1875, to Harriet Cornelia [Markle], daughter of Gen. C. P. [Cyrus Painter Markle] and Sarah (Lippincott) Markle, of Westmoreland county, Pa., and has one son, Cyrus P. [Cyrus Painter Tinstman], who has completed the civil engineering course at the Pennsylvania military college, at Chester, Pa. Mr. Tinstman and family have lived in Turtle Creek since the erection of their beautiful home there in 1879. The site of a pioneer cabin, long since gone to decay, and the home of a Mrs Myers, who gave food and shelter to George Washington, are on the Tinstman grounds. During the Civil war, when General Morgan was making his famous raid through the State of Ohio, Mr. Tinstman raised a company in twenty-four hours at Broad Ford, Pa., and went to Salineville, where they arrived just in time to assist in Morgan's capture. 
Abraham Overholt Tintsman
 
263 According to the 1860 Federal Census of Kitanning, Armstrong County, PA, "E. Spencer" was 48 years old, and the head of a household wherein lived William Spencer, age 17, Rosana Spencer, age 18, and Chambers Spencer, age 22.  Elizabeth Waltenbaugh
 
264 The marriage of Jeremiah Cook to Hannah Walter is unconfirmed, it is drawn from various Internet sources and not footnoted here.  Hannah Walter
 
265 From her obituary:

"Grace E. Wilder, 83, of 150 Woodland Avenue, died Friday at the Henry Heywood Memorial Hospital. Born in Gardner Jan 5, 1899, she was the daughter of the late Harlan P. and Roxa (Gates) Wilder, and lived here most of her life.

She leaves a brother, Lawrence P. Wilder of Baltimore, Md, and several nieces and nephews.

She was employed as executive secretary for the Collier Keywood Co., where she worked for about 50 years, retiring in the late 1970s.

She was a member of the First Congregational Church as well as its women's group.  
Grace Evangeline Wilder
 
266 NOTE: a lot of information in this file is not proven
-Dale A. Updike 
Elizabeth Willoughby
 
267 United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Eighth Census of the United States, 1860, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860 Source: 1860 United States Federal Census
 
268 United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Tenth Census of the United States, 1880, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1880 Source: 1880 United States Federal Census
 
269 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: 1910 United States Federal Census
 
270 United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1920 Source: 1920 United States Federal Census
 
271 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: 1930 United States Federal Census
 
272 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Birth Certificate - Alcorn, Virginia Jean
 
273 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Birth Certificate - Eady, Jacqueline
 
274 State of California, California Death Index, 1940-1997, Sacramento, CA, USA: State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics Source: California Death Index, 1940-1997
 
275 From "Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage" magazine, Volume X, Number 1, January, 1987; article by Jeanne Hoover, "Elizabeth Township Kinsmen and Some of Their Descendants from the Time of Settlement" Source: Cemetery File, Elizabeth Twp
 
276 Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Source: ear: 1900; Census Place: Rutland, Worcester, Massachusetts; Roll: T623 694; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 1674.
 
277 State of Florida, Florida Death Index, 1877-1998, Florida: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, 1998 Source: Florida Death Index, 1877-1998
 
278 The Internationl Genealogical Index (IGI) is a collection of millions of deceased persons from throughout the world. The records include information from individual research and extracted original vital records from the early 1500's to about 1885. The index lists names, dates, and places for births, christenings, and marriages. Source: IGI Record
 
279 Entry for William Spencer; sheet 293, line 21, Manor Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania; (National Archives Publication M432, roll 749)

On July 30, 1850 the census enumerator, Mr. Hugh Campbell, enumerated William Spencer and his family. This was dwelling number 40 and family number 40 in order of visitation for Mr. Campbell. William was a 48-year old farmer who claimed that he was born in Pennsylvania. ? CDW 04/09/2002

Elizabeth is listed as William Spencer?s wife in the 1850 census. She was 44 years old at the time and she claimed that she was born in Pennsylvania. ? CDW 04/09/2002

Samuel is listed as the eldest child living with William and Elizabeth Spencer in the 1850 census. He was 20 years old at the time and he was born in Pennsylvania. ? CDW 04/09/2002

Josiah is listed as the second oldest child living with William and Elizabeth Spencer in the 1850 census. He was 16 years old at the time and he was born in Pennsylvania. ? CDW 04/09/2002

Richard is listed as the third child living with William and Elizabeth Spencer in the 1850 census. He was 8 years old at the time and he was born in Pennsylvania. Also, Richard attended school within the past year. ? CDW 04/09/2002

Hannah is listed as the fourth child living with William and Elizabeth Spencer in the 1850 census. She was 5 years old at the time and she was born in Pennsylvania. Also, Hannah attended school within the past year. ? CDW 04/09/2002

Aramanda [sic] is listed as the fifth child living with William and Elizabeth Spencer in the 1850 census. She was 3 years old at the time and she was born in Pennsylvania. ? CDW 04/09/2002

William is listed as the sixth and youngest child living with William and Elizabeth Spencer in the 1850 census. He was either 3 or 8 months old at the time. The handwriting is hard to read. This information means that he was probably born in either November 1849 or April 1850. Additionally, he was born in Pennsylvania. ? CDW 04/09/2002 
Source: National ARchives Publication M432, roll 749
 
280 Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2007. Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration. Source: Number: 019-05-3333;Issue State: Massachusetts;Issue Date: Before 1951.
 
281 Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2007. Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration. Source: Number: 214-18-5789;Issue State: Maryland;Issue Date: Before 1951.
 
282 The name "New Salem Borough" was changed officially to "Delmont" in 1871 Source: Pittsburgh Tribune Review
 
283 Social Security Administration, Social Security Death Index, Master File, : Social Security Administration Source: Social Security Death Index
 
284 Largely compiled of other sources, incl. many personal anecdotes Source: The Adventures of the Kettenring Family in America
 
285 Online reference

http://genealogytrails.com/penn/armstrong/history/History.html

source is transcribed by Nancy Piper 
Source: The Biographical and Historical Encyclopedia of Indiana and Armstrong Counties, Pa
 
286 United States, Selective Service System, World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration Source: U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
 
287 Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2002. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls. Source: Year: 1930; Census Place: Baltimore, Baltimore (Independent City), Maryland; Roll: 859; Page: 16B; Enumeration District: 505; Image: 924.0.
 
288 William Spencer citation on 1850 Census found in Cab. 2 Drawer 6 thru Cab. 4 Drawer 6

Telephone for NARA 866-140-1752

Address will change as of 2011:

Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House at One Bowling Green in New York City. Our new home will be located in the same building as the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian. The building is currently known as the Custom House building, designed by Cass Gilbert in the Beaux Arts style and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

After extensive renovation, our new space will be ready in the fall of 2011.We will announce the exact dates of the move as soon as possible. 
 

      «Prev «1 ... 2 3 4 5 6