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201 According to Jules Dudock autobiography, Sam Polansky was fourteen years old in 1904:

"They were very happy to be here, even though there was no money to speak of. They were not afraid to face hardship, courage was their inheritance. Sam was fourteen years old and Max eleven full of hope and ambition, the year was 1904 and Simon was back there in Germany out of danger of the gangsters back in Colonia, Romania. They missed him and wanted him with them in New York too." 
Sam Polansky
 
202 According to Jules Dudock's autobiography, Simon Polansky was sixteen years old in 1904:

"When they arrived in Bremen, Germany, they found themselves in a very agonizing position. They did not have enough money to pay for the passage after all their figuring, the price was raised after they had started out. They had no choice but to leave Simon, the oldest of the three brothers, in Bremen. He was sixteen years old, and a rabbi helped him to get him a job taking care of some horses in the area near the docks..."

"They [Samuel, Anna, Ida, Sam and Max Polansky] were very happy to be here, even though there was no money to speak of. They were not afraid to face hardship, courage was their inheritance. Sam was fourteen years old and Max eleven full of hope and ambition, the year was 1904 and Simon was back there in Germany out of danger of the gangsters back in Colonia, Romania. They missed him and wanted him with them in New York too." 
Simon Polansky
 
203 She was born in New York. Her maiden name was Lewis. Her father was
David Lewis. This was her second marriage and Alfred's first. They
were married by James Fletcher, Pastor of 3d. Congregational Church. He
was a Gardener by occupation, and his residence at time of marriage was
Danvers. Her residence was Middleton. 
NANCY A. RICHARDSON
 
204 Name Suffix:
Name Prefix: President
Ancestral File Number: 8QSM-KS
Assuming the Presidency at the depth of the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt helped the American people regain faith in themselves. He brought hope as he promised prompt, vigorous action, and asserted in his Inaugural Address, "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself."
Born in 1882 at Hyde Park, New York--now a national historic site--he attended Harvard University and Columbia Law School. On St. Patrick's Day, 1905, he married Eleanor Roosevelt.
Following the example of his fifth cousin, President Theodore Roosevelt, whom he greatly admired, Franklin D. Roosevelt entered public service through politics, but as a Democrat. He won election to the New York Senate in 1910. President Wilson appointed him Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and he was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 1920.
In the summer of 1921, when he was 39, disaster hit-he was stricken with poliomyelitis. Demonstrating indomitable courage, he fought to regain the use of his legs, particularly through swimming. At the 1924 Democratic Convention he dramatically appeared on crutches to nominate Alfred E. Smith as "the Happy Warrior." In 1928 Roosevelt became Governor of New Yor
He was elected President in November 1932, to the first of four terms. By March there were 13,000,000 unemployed, and almost every bank was closed. In his first "hundred days," he proposed, and Congress enacted, a sweeping program to bring recovery to business and agriculture, relief to the unemployed and to those in danger of losing farms and homes, and reform, especially through the establishment of the Tennessee Valley Authority.
By 1935 the Nation had achieved some measure of recovery, but businessmen and bankers were turning more and more against Roosevelt's New Deal program. They feared his experiments, were appalled because he had taken the Nation off the gold standard and allowed deficits in the budget, and disliked the concessions to labor. Roosevelt responded with a new program of reform: Social Security, heavier taxes on the wealthy, new controls over banks and public utilities, and an enormous work relief program for the unemployed.
In 1936 he was re-elected by a top-heavy margin. Feeling he was armed with a popular mandate, he sought legislation to enlarge the Supreme Court, which had been invalidating key New Deal measures. Roosevelt lost the Supreme Court battle, but a revolution in constitutional law took place. Thereafter the Government could legally regulate the economy.
Roosevelthad pledged the United States to the "good neighbor" policy, transforming the Monroe Doctrine from a unilateral American manifesto into arrangements for mutual action against aggressors. He also sought through neutrality legislation to keep the United States out of the war in Europe, yet at the same time to strengthen nations threatened or attacked. When France fell and England came under siege in 1940, he began to send Great Britain all possible aid short of actual military involvement.
When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Roosevelt directed organization of the Nation's manpower and resources for global wa
Feeling that the future peace of the world would depend upon relations between the United States and Russia, he devoted much thought to the planning of a United Nations, in which, he hoped, international difficulties could be settled.
As the war drew to a close, Roosevelt's health deteriorated, and on April 12, 1945, while at Warm Springs, Georgia, he died of a cerebral hemorrhage.
Thirty-Second President1933-1945
Born: January 30, 1882 in Hyde Park, New York
Died: April 12, 1945 in Warm Springs, Georgia
Married to Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
Taken from:
www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/ 
Franklin Delano Roosevelt
 
205 Ancestral File Number: 8HQR-V7 James ROOSEVELT
 
206 According to her obituary (below), Eunice Barbara Rose was a descendant of Jean-Baptiste Baudreau de Graveline who came to the Gulf Coast with Pierre Le Moyne D'Iberville in 1699.  Eunice Barbara Rose
 
207 Elizabeth's maiden name, "Shirk" is an educated guess; according to the 1880 census, the household of Joseph Kettering includes Joseph's brother-in-law, Harrison Shirk Elizabeth Shirk
 
208 Benjamin Sibley settled in North Adams, Massachusetts. He moved to Western New York State after the death of his wife (Zilpha Davis died in 1824) Benjamin Sibley
 
209 Joseph Sibley was one of the original settlers of Sutton, MA. All his children were born there. He was a fisherman and on his return from a fishing trip to Cape Sable he was impressed on board a British frigate, put to hard service for seven weeks before being sent home.  Joseph Sibley
 
210 Ancestral File Number: 8QS4-4H Margaret Mackall "Peggy" SMITH
 
211 According to the history compiled by Gayle R. Spencer, JR., Armanda (AKA "Arminta") died at the age of 12 Aramanda Spencer
 
212 According to source, Charlotte died in early childhood Charlotte Spencer
 
213 From "Armstrong County Pennsylvania: Her People, Past and Present Embracing a History of the County, Volume 1, J. H. Beers & Co., Chicago, 1914." ...

"John Sibbett in 1854 laid out the town of Manorville, which lies between Kittanning and Ford City. It was incorporated as a borough in 1866.
The following borough officers were elected at the first borough election: Burgess, Joseph M. Kelley; town council, Jesse Butler, Calvin Russell, David Spencer, Peter F. Titus and Samuel Spencer; justices of the peace, John Mcllvaine and A. Briney; school directors, for three years, David Spencer and Dietrich Stoelzing; school directors, for two years, A. Rhoades and M. A. Lambing; school directors, for one year, R. C. Russell and Jesse Butler; high constable, Jonas M. Briney; borough auditors, Robert McKean, Milton McCormick and W. M. Patterson; judge of election, Joseph M. Kelley; inspectors of election, William Copley and H. M. Lambing; assessor, David Spencer; overseers of the poor, James Kilgore and George W. Shoop."

I don't have a specific citation indicating that the David Spencer listed in this tree is the same David Spencer cited in the book, but it seems likely and is pending investigation. 
David Spencer
 
214 Will was executed on 18 April 1892 David Spencer
 
215 From an unknown newspaper obituary

MRS HANNAH KETTERING
Thursday at 3;55 AM occurred the death of Mrs. Hannah Kettering, aged 84 years, 3 months, and 11 days, at her home in Kiskiminitas Avenue, following a two week's illness of pneumonia. She was the widow of the late Casper Kettering. Funeral services will be held at the late residence Sunday afternoon at two o;clock, and will be in charge of Rev. W.L.Morgan, pastor of the M.E. Church, assisted by Rev. O.B. Patterson, a former pastor. Internment will follow in the Apollo Cemetery. Surviving are the followiing children: Mrs William M. Boyd, of Canton, Ohio, Mrs. William Harrington, of Marietta, Ohio, Mrs. Elizabeth Barber, of Grove City; Charles C. of this place, Mrs. Edward Ewing, of Saltzburg; and Miss Winifred, at home.  
Hannah Cunningham Spencer
 
216 This is the an excerpt from a letter written in 1932 by a Mr. James Alcorn of Apollo PA to a Mrs. Letitia Troutman of St. Petersburg FL.

Joshua Spencer came to the United States from England when about seven years of age, with his parents. The parents were both killed by the Indians when crossing the mountains of Pennsylvania. An Indian Squaw took Joshua as her son, because she had just lost a son. He was twith the Indians for several years. He went on many fishing and hunting trips, staying longer and going further on each trip. At last he made his escape but was recaptured by the British in Northwestern Pennsylvania, this was during
the War of the Revolution. Later he was traded as a pisoner of War the the Continental Army. He was taken to Carolina where the Governer on hearing his story released him and he was later educated by the Governer of Virginia. Joshua Spencer married a German woman near Greensburg Pennsylvania by the name of Luckbaug (or something like that) and had 8 children;
The Children of Joshua Spencer
Lottie
William married Elizabeth Cook my great-grandparents (**meaning James Alcorn)
Polly Jack Hartman
Hannah Wm Cunningham
Joshua Betsy Rupert
Flavil Betsy Tarce
John
Betsy Elizabeth Jake Shaffer

It seems impossible for me to go back any further as the mosi is tradition, and Joshua seemed to have remembered very little about his parents.

End of letter.  
Joshua Spencer
 
217 From "Armstrong County Pennsylvania: Her People, Past and Present Embracing a History of the County, Volume 1, J. H. Beers & Co., Chicago, 1914." ...

"John Sibbett in 1854 laid out the town of Manorville, which lies between Kittanning and Ford City. It was incorporated as a borough in 1866.
The following borough officers were elected at the first borough election: Burgess, Joseph M. Kelley; town council, Jesse Butler, Calvin Russell, David Spencer, Peter F. Titus and Samuel Spencer; justices of the peace, John Mcllvaine and A. Briney; school directors, for three years, David Spencer and Dietrich Stoelzing; school directors, for two years, A. Rhoades and M. A. Lambing; school directors, for one year, R. C. Russell and Jesse Butler; high constable, Jonas M. Briney; borough auditors, Robert McKean, Milton McCormick and W. M. Patterson; judge of election, Joseph M. Kelley; inspectors of election, William Copley and H. M. Lambing; assessor, David Spencer; overseers of the poor, James Kilgore and George W. Shoop."

I don't have a specific citation indicating that the Samuel Spencer listed in this tree is the same Samuel Spencer cited in the book, but it seems likely and is pending investigation.  
Samuel Spencer
 
218 from Davis, pp. 210 (PDF pp. 214)

Abraham Stauffer, b. 1752. d. 26 Sep 1826, Tyrone Township, Fayette County,
Pennsylvania, age 74 years. He wrote his will on 22 Jan 1819 and it was proved 25 Jan 1827. The
executor of his will was Martin Stauffer and John Stauffer. He married first Anna Nisley (20 Sep
1752-1817), daughter of Martin Nisley and Anna Snyder. According to his will his second wife that
had been married before. On 15 Aug 1768, he was a minor child of Christian Stauffer, late of
Donegal Township, over the age of 14 when he chose John Hertzler of Hempfield Township and
Jacob Ebersole of Donegal Township as his guardians. Abraham was taxed at Donegal Township in
1771 as a single man and then his name was crossed of which would indicate that he married in
1771. He was taxed at Donegal Township from 1773 to 1778 and then he was taxed at Manor
Township from 1779 to 1789. He purchased his father’s land in Manor Township in 1772 from his
brother John. In 1780 he owned 134 acres with his brother John at Manor Township. He was taxed
on 136 in 1785 and 137 in 1786. He moved to Fayette County, Pennsylvania from Manor Township
in 1790, where he was a Mennonite Minister. He was of Lancaster County when he bought bought
278 acres in Tyrone Township, Fayette County on 6 Mar 1790 from Benjamin Wills. On 11 Jun 1793
he bought 43 acres in Tyrone Township with John Stauffer from Moses Smith and they sold that land
with their wives on 10 Sep 1801 to Jacob Baltzly. He bought 92 acres in Franklin Township (later
Dunbar Township) on 8 Nov 1791 from Thomas Hall which he sold to his son Abraham on 18 May
1800. He bought 100 acres on Jacob’s Creek in Tyrone Township from Isaac Meason on 25 Apr
1795 and sold that 100 acres with his wife Anna to Jacob Eckman on 3 Oct 1795. On 1 Mar 1796
he bought land in Bullskin Township from Francis Moriarity. On 15 Sep 1796 he bought land in
Franklin Township from Thomas Hall. In 1810 he sold his Franklin Township land to his son
Christian. He patented 120 acres on Jacob’s Creek in Tyrone Township on 8 Sep 1790 which he sold
to his son Martin on 2 Jun 1806. He was living at East Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland on 20
Apr 1817 when he and his wife Anna sold land in Tyrone Township to their son Abraham. He
bought 30 acres in Bullskin Township on 20 Apr 1820 and he was living at East Huntingdon
Township on 20 Feb 1824 when he and his unnamed wife sold the 30 acres to Martin Stouffer of
Tyrone Township and John Stouffer of East Huntingdon Township. He was living at Tyrone
Township in the 1800 census (02101-20101).STAUFFER, ABRAHAM, Colebrookdale.
August 4, 1799 - March 11, 1800.
Provides for wife Susanna.
To son Henry my plantation where I now live containing about 150 acres, except a part devised to son Jacob, at appraised value.
To son Jacob a part of the plantation at appraised value.
Estate divided among all children, viz: John, Samuel, Margaret wife of John KINDIG, Jacob, Elizabeth wife of Jacob MEYER, Maria and Henry.
Exrs: Sons John and Jacob.
Wits: Jacob BAUMAN, Isaac BAUMAN and Peter RICHARDSON. 
Abraham Stauffer
 
219 From "Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage" magazine, Volume X, Number 1, January, 1987; article by Jeanne Hoover, "Elizabeth Township Kinsmen and Some of Their Descendants from the Time of Settlement"

"Lived on a tract of land adjacent to his father; taxed for two mills in 1771. His will was proved Apr 28 1808 and he was buried with his wife and some of their children in the cemetery along Zartman Mill road in Elizabeth Township.  
Christian Stauffer
 
220 From Davis, pp 182 (PDF pp 186)

5164. Christian Stauffer, b. 21 Jul 1744, Warwick. d. 1795, Londonderry, Dauphin County,
Pennsylvania. He married Veronica Hostetter on 2 Mar 1766. He was named in his father's will and
inherited along with his brother Jacob, his father's 194 acres in Warwick Township. They sold the
land shortly after the death of their father and both moved to Londonderry township, Lancaster
County. He was taxed at Londonderry Township in 1772 and 1773 on 50 acres. He and his brother
Jacob were listed on the muster roll of the Londonderry Township militia in 1775. He was taxed at
Lebanon Township (now Annville Township) from 1779 to 1787 (next to Zinn’s place) as a renter.
He was taxed at Londonderry Township in 1788 on 127 acres. He was living at Dauphin County in
the 1790 census (3-3-3). The administrator of his will in1795 was Henry Ober of Rapho Township.
In the will of his father, his brother John, who was only 12 years old at the time was to receive the
family German Bible. However Christian ended up with the Bible and then passed it on to his oldest
son John. The Bible was later given to the Lebanon Historical Society. 
Christian Stauffer
 
221 from Davis, pp 197 (PDF pp. 201

521. Christian Stauffer, b. c1711. d. 1759, Donegal Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.
He married first Maria Fellmann (1719-12 Mar 1741, age 21), daughter of Johannes Fellmann in
about 1737. Maria died at Bierholderhof, Rohrbach and was buried at Heidelberg, Germany.
Christian married secondly, Barbara [?Fellmann] in about 1742 in Germany. She may have been a
sister to Christian's first wife. There were three different Mennonite census reports for Alsheim made
at different times in 1738. On the first 1738 census report for Alsheim, Christian is listed right after
his probable father Daniel Stauffer. He apparently took over the farm at Alsheim of his cousin
Christian Stauffer in 1737 when his cousin emigrated that year to Pennsylvania. The second Alsheim
census report made later in 1738 did not list names, only the number of men (3), women (4) and
children (9), but in the previous list it showed four men; Daniel Stauffer, Christian Stauffer, Johannes
Schmitt and Daniel Schmitt. On the third and probably the last 1738 Mennonite census (Bender's
list) only Daniel Stauffer, Johannes Schmitt and Daniel Schmitt were listed. Christian apparently
moved to Rohrbach near Heidelberg in 1738 from Alsheim to help take care of his wife's widowed
mother. He was not listed on the first 1738 census list at Rohrbach, but appears on the second 1738
Mennonite census list at Rohrbach with his wife and one child and mother-in-law (shows incorrectly
son-in-law) and her four children. In 1743 he was living at Rohrbach with his wife and one son and
also Johann Fellmann's widow and her 2 sons and 2 daughters. It states in the Mennonite census of
Rohrbach of 1753 that Jakob Fellmann assumed the lease of his brother-in-law Christian Stauffer in
1744, because Stauffer emigrated to the "New Land". He emigrated in 1744 in a group of 8 people
and left his leasehold to his brother-in-law Jakob Fellman.30 The eight people were probably
Christian and his wife and two children and his brother Hans and Hans’ wife and two children.
Christian Stauffer arrived in Pennsylvania on 22 Dec 1744 on the ship "Muscliffe Galley" signing
his name next to his brother Hans Stauffer. He bought land in Donegal Township on 7 Mar 1749
from Christian Kauffman. Christian was a witness to a deed with Abraham Meyer at Donegal
Township on 6 Dec 1758 between Jacob Hertzler and Michael Graff. It was part of the land that was
patented to Christian Stauffer on 8 May 1751 which Stauffer later sold to Hertzler. He warranted 25
acres in Donegal Township on 17 May 1750 next to his other land. He wrote his will on 24 Mar 1759
and it was proved 12 Jun 1759. The executors of his will were Barbara Stauffer and Jacob Hertzler.
He mentioned his wife Barbara in his will and his children, but not by name. His widow Barbara
married secondly Martin Nisley of Donegal Township in about 1768. He bought land in Manor
Township in 1750 which his executors sold to his son John in1768. In 1772 his son John and John’s
wife Elizabeth sold this Manor Township land to Abraham Stauffer. 
Christian Stauffer
 
222 From Davis, pp 23 (PDF pp. 27)

11111. Christian Stauffer, b. c1580, Luchsmatt, Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland. d. after 6 Apr
1672, Dirmstein, Bayern, Germany. He married first Adelheid Oppliger, daughter of Peter
Opliger and Adelheid Blonier on 18 Jun 1610 at Röthenbach. He married secondly Asenath
Friedrich. Adelheid his first wife died in May 1656 and in July 1656, Christian lived together
with Asenath Friedrich either at Glashütte or at Hinten in Eggiwil.3 Christian and Asenath were
not married at the state church, which would probably indicate an Anabaptist marriage. On 6
Nov 1611, Christian was called son of Claus of Luchsmatt farm when he baptized his daughter
Madlena at Röthenbach. In 1618 he appears on the Eggiwil tax rolls as living at Gläshutte farm
in Eggiwil for the first time. On 28 Apr 1622 he was called a "public Taüffer" when his brother
Uli Stauffer brought Christen's son Peter from Eggiwil to be baptized at Röthenbach.
Eggiwil is situated in the Emmenthal Valley in Bern. The Emmenthal Valley was a hotbed of
Anabaptist activity and their numbers were growing, which greatly alarmed the authorities in
Bern. By 1671, Eggiwil had a large group of Anabaptists, numbering about 40 adults, which
when you add in their children probably totaled over 100 people. On May, 3 1671, the
magistrate of Signau received orders from Bern to seize the Anabaptists of Eggiwil and bring
them to the prison in Bern, where they would then be led out of Switzerland. The village
community of Eggiwil refused to permit this, probably because so many of them had relatives
who were Anabaptists and also because many themselves had leanings toward the Anabaptist
faith. Shortly thereafter twelve of the wealthiest residents of Eggiwil were sent to the city of
Bern as hostages until the Anabaptists agreed to be delivered to the Bern prison or to leave the
land. They agreed to the latter. On October 16, 1671, the Reformed pastor of Eggiwil was able
to report that the Anabaptist had left of their own accord4. They were not allowed to take much
and probably had some of their possessions and lands confiscated as an emigration tax, as well
as having their citizenship taken away. They would become refugees without a country.
According to Valentine Hütwohl, a Mennonite Minister in the Pfalz, on December 14, 1671,
450 Anabaptists from Bern had recently arrived in the Pfalz. "These are scattered among the
fellow believers throughout the region over a twelve-mile territory. Among these you will find
those who need canes, being 70, 80 and 90 years old. On the whole they need clothing sorely;
they didn't take more along than what they had on their backs. With little bedding, we don't
know how to keep them warm. Some amongst us have seven, eight or nine living with them.
When you speak of their property, they sigh, wishing that they had their houses and farm land
here as before. There are men who left their wives and children, and women, older as well as
younger, who have left husbands and children; others who brought along some, leaving the rest
with the husbands, also expectant mothers; also children who left father, mother, brothers and
sisters behind"5.
Included in the Hütwohl letter was a list of the Swiss refugees. On 1 Jan 1672 Christian
Stauffer was listed as a Swiss Anabaptist refugee, age over 90 years old living at Ibersheim,
Germany with his second wife, age 70 years. It states that he was he was the father, grandfather
and great grandfather of 94, of whom 16 were dead and 78 living. On 6 Apr 1672 he was living
at Dirmstein, Bayern, Germany, age 90, with his wife Asenath Frederick, age 70. Also living in
his household were Daniel Stauffer, Ulli Stauffer, Christian Stauffer, age 65 (sic 56) and their
wives, Babbi Galli, age 43, Babbi Stauffer, age 41 and Margriet Antony, age 50 years. It stated
that "they live together and have altogether 21 children, of whom many were left in Switzerland.
They said they have debts to repay, and cows and tools to buy and would manage with 100 Reich
Dollars". They were given 250 florins.4 Christian also had grandchildren named Schenk and
Neukommet who were also exiled and living in the Pfalz at that time. 
Christian Stauffer
 
223 From Davis, pp 92 (PDF pp 96)

Christian Stauffer, b. 19 Mar 1615, Luchsmatt Farm, Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland. He was
baptized at Röthenbach. He died after 1672 at Dirmstein, Bayern, Germany. He married Margret
Anthoni. His wife Margret (b. 1621) was listed as age 50 years and a Swiss Anabaptist refugee
living at Oberflörsheim, Hesse, Germany on 1 January 1672, having left her husband and seven
children behind in Switzerland. It stated that she had one child with her making a total of eight
children. Christian later joined his wife and was listed as an Anabaptist living at Dirmstein,
Bayern, Germany on 6 April 1672 with his wife, some children, his father, two brothers and their
families. It states that he and his two brothers had a total of 21 children, many of whom were still
in Switzerland. His father was Christian in Family “A”. 
Christian Stauffer
 
224 From Davis, pp. 154 (PDF pp 158)

512. Christian Stauffer, b. 1709. d. 1747, Warwick Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.
From a bible record found in Kansas City, Missouri the following was written on the first page "Year
1730, 10th of November have I, Christian Stauffer, from Mückenhäusen married afterwards at home
unto the Vet. Christian Kintzi daughter by name Barbara Kintzin who was born in the year 1705 God
our Lord give us grace and blessing that we live according to his will".20 It appears that Christian was
married at "home" which was at Mückenhäuserhof. His wife's father, Christian Kuntzi lived at
nearby Alsheim. By 1732 he moved to Alsheim, perhaps taking over the farm of his father-in-law
who apparently died about that time. In the purchase records of Alsheim on 31 Jan 1732 Christian
Stauffer purchased from Philipp Lösch of Dorndürkheim a piece of farmland. On 7 Apr 1733 he was
called Christel Stauffer when he bought 6 pieces of land for cultivation at the local auction at
Alsheim. On 6 May 1733 Christian Stauffer was appointed the local mayor of Alsheim with Peter
Balzhäuser for a period of one year. Apparently Christian never served as mayor as he transferred
the office to Johann Georg Jost. On 21 Oct 1735 Christian Stauffer in the court records of Alsheim
made a charge against Heinrich Rüster for money the latter did no pay. He arrived in Philadelphia
on 24 Sep 1737, age 28 on the ship "Virtuous Grace" with his younger brother Johannes Stauffer, age
20. He requested to take up 20 acres adjoining George Cough in Warwick Township, Lancaster
County, Pennsylvania on 25 Mar 1738 but it was never patented. He apparently died before he
patented the land. He was living next to Christian Bomberger in Warwick Township in 1742
according to a deed. On 30 Jan 1742 he signed Christian Bomberger’s will as a witness. The
signature matches his signature on the 1737 ship list. On 18 Dec 1747 the bond for Christian
Stouffer, deceased was issued with the administration papers issued to Barbara Stouffer (his widow),
Jacob Stouffer Sr. (his probable brother), and John Stouffer (his probable brother). The bondsmen
were in addition to the previously named were, Jacob Stouffer Jr. (his probable cousin and younger
than his brother Jacob), John Brubaker Jr., and Abraham Meyer. On 2 Jun 1767 in the orphan court
records at Lancaster he was called Christian Stauffer formerly of Warwick township, deceased when
Jacob Erb was chosen to be the guardian of his son Jacob who was a minor child over the age of 14
years. The entry in the orphan court was made at the same time that his brother John’s daughter
Catherine was assigned a guardian. Apparently his brother John, (who was one of his administrators)
was the guardian of his son Jacob until his death in 1767. On 7 Jun 1769, Jacob Stauffer his
surviving administrator came to the orphan court with 251 pounds 18 shillings 3 pence in hand,
which was the balance of the Christian’s estate. The estate money was distributed in 3 equal shares.
83.15.5 to the Barbara, “widow of the deceased” 83.15.5 to the “eldest son” John and 83.15.5 to
Jacob “another son”. Apparently his estate was not settled until his youngest son Jacob came of age
in either 1768 or 1769. Christian probably had other children who died without issue by 1769.

20The Bible information was sent to me by Phillip Leonard of Washington D.C. 
Christian Stauffer
 
225 From Davis, pp 150 (PDF pp 154)

511. Daniel Stauffer, b. 1707. d. 1776, Shenandoah County (now Page County), Virginia. He
supposedly married Eva. He arrived in Philadelphia, age 24 with his probable brother Jacob on the
ship "Pink Plaisance" on 19 Sep 1732. He probably settled first in Warwick Township, Lancaster
County, Pennsylvania with his brother. By 1743 he moved to the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia,
where he was one of the leaders of the Mennonite congregation by 1758. One source says he was
married to Eva Albrecht, however there was an Eva Albrecht who was married to John Rhodes, a
Mennonite minister living at the same place. I'm not sure which man was actually married to Eva.
Daniel bought 196 acres in Augusta County, Virginia (now Page County) on South River of
Shenandoah at the mouth of Hawksbill Neck from Peter Ruffner on 11 Apr 1746 for 10 pounds
current Virginia money. Isaac Strickler was one of the witnesses to the deed in 1746. In 1748,
Daniel was the administrator of the estate of John Campbell of Augusta County. He was the guardian
of the Campbell children in 1750 and had been for 6 years. On 19 Feb 1747 he, John Davis,
Alexander Matthews and George Leath were the witnesses to the administration of Abraham Drake’s
estate at Augusta County. On 16 Jun 1749 he, Jacob Borner and John Holdeman were the appraisers
of the goods from the estate of Martin Kaufman in Augusta County. Daniel Stover, Mathias Selzer
and Jacob Burnett made the inventory of the estate of Rude Mack at Augusta County on 16 Jun 1749.
He could not write and made his mark “D” on the ship list in 1732 and also later in Virginia ‘DS”.
On 7 Sep 1758, Daniel Stauffer, Martin Kaufmann, Jacob Borner, Samuel Bohm and others of the
Virginia Mennonite congregation wrote to the Mennonites in Holland asking for assistance from the
Indians. The letter was written one mile from Lancaster Town, Pennsylvania. He was taxed at
Frederick County, Virginia in 1759 and 1764. He was granted 200 acres in Frederick County adjacent
to the land of John Bumgartner on3 Jul 1761. On 25 Jul 1761, Daniel was of Frederick County,
Virginia when he bought 408 acres adjoining the lands of William Calfee in Frederick County from
Charles and Elizabeth Reagan. The witnesses to the deed were James Jones and George Leith. On
6 Aug 1765, he was of Frederick County, Virginia when he bought 385 acres on Pass Run in
Frederick County from John and Mary Wood of Frederick County. The witnesses to the deed were
John Hite, Jacob Vertree and Fergus Cron. Daniel was taxed at Dunmore County (later became
Shenandoah) in 1774, 1775 and 1776. On 26 Aug 1776, his son Samuel Stover and Samuel’s wife
Barbara sold 330 acres to John Lionberger and the deed stated that the land was first granted to John
Wood on 1 Jan 1753 and that John Wood later sold it to Daniel Stover, now deceased. On 26 Aug
1776 Samuel and his wife sold additional land totaling 385 acres on Pass Run to John Lionberger and
the deed stated that it was land original granted to John Wood on 17 Nov 1752 and Wood conveyed
the land to Daniel Stover, now deceased and Daniel conveyed it to his son Samuel. Daniel apparently
bought at least four tracts of land over his lifetime, 196 acres, 408 acres, 385 acres and 330 acres
totaling 1319 acres. His son Samuel had two tracts of 330 acres and 385 acres which he sold in 1776
to John Lionberger. The Stauffers who went to Virginia, on the most part had their name anglicized
to Stover. 
Daniel Stauffer
 
226 From Davis, pp 196-197 (PDF pp 201)

52. Daniel Stauffer, b. c1685. d. 1751, Alsheim, Hesse, Germany. In 1727 his brother Christian
returned from Mannheim and paid him money, apparently to take over the lease for the
Mückenhäuserhof. Daniel probably then moved to nearby Alsheim that same year. In 1729 the two
tenants at Mückenhäuserhof were Daniel's brother Christian Stauffer and his step-brother Johann
Jacob Brubacher. In the court records of Alsheim Daniel Stauffer is found on a list of persons dated
5 Dec 1730. On 7 Apr 1733 he bought 2 pieces of land for cultivation in Alsheim at a local auction.
On 14 Jul 1733 in a tax matter he is mentioned as "Daniel Stauffer from Stiftneyhausen", which
probably refers to Stift Neuhausen who might have owned properties at Alsheim, cultivated by Daniel
Stauffer and not meaning that Daniel Stauffer lived at Neuhausen. On 18 May 1734 at the cattle
market at Guntersblum he was called Daniel Stauffer of Alsheim when he made a transaction. He
was also mentioned as "of Alsheim" at the Guntersblum cattle market on 29 Oct 1737. In 1738 there
were three different Mennonite census reports made. On the first list he was listed but no statistics
were given on the families. On the second Mennonite census in 1738 there where a total of 3 men,
4 women and 9 children, but no names given. On the third list (Bender's list) it shows that Daniel
Stauffer had a wife and four children in 1738. On 6 Oct 1739 there was a letter written by Daniel
Stauffer to the bailiff at Alzey. He wrote "I am the temporary leaseholder of the Ducal-Lorrainese
superior bailiff Herr von Langen at Alsheim...in my responsibility there are several goods that are
owned by the orphans that are placed under my care as a guardian..". In the letter he complains that
he had to pay Turk tax and poll tax twice, though temporary leaseholders usually were exempted.
No other names or family dates are given in the letter. In the 1743 Mennonite census report for
Alsheim, Daniel was listed as a widower with one son and two daughters. Sometime between 1743
and 1751 he married again. In inheritance matters of the court of Alsheim from 1734-1773, there
were letters written by the district office of Alzey sent to the village authorities of Alsheim
concerning the "Obsignierung" of Daniel Stauffer. The first was very short, dated 13 Oct 1751 and
contains the sentence "regarding the deceased Mennonite Stauffer, leaseholder of von Lang". The
second letter is dated 2 Nov 1751 and only contains the information that Daniel Stauffer was the
leaseholder of Freiherr von Lang at Alsheim. In the 1753 Mennonite census report it shows that his
widow was listed at Alsheim with two children. His son Daniel Stauffer (c1728-1785) was called
"of Alsheim" when he bought Abraham Brubacher's widow's farm at Ibersheim in 1754. Another
probable son was Christian Stauffer (c1711-1759) who was listed next to him on the first 1738 census
report and who was not listed on the other two lists for that same year. Christian appears on the
second 1738 list at Rohrbach near Heidelberg and emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1744. Christian had
a brothers named Hans who also emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1744. The Jacob Stauffer who
emigrated in 1732 was probably his son and Martin Stauffer who emigrated in 1742 was probably
also a son of Daniel. Daniel had at lease two daughters, but their names are not known. 
Daniel Stauffer
 
227 He was a Mennonite living at
Stauffer/Stouffer Part 1
18Stadtarchiv Worms, Abt 51 (Rheindürkheim), Nr. 25, pg. 483-89 Schatzungsregister
Mückenhäuserhof 1710.
19Landesarchiv Speyer, file F 22 #131a.
149
Branchweilerhof near Neustadt, Bayern, Germany in 1682 and 1685. He made a lease for the
property at Branchweilerhof in 1682 with his wife Anna, Jacob Weber and Fritz Dester and their
wives. He moved from Branchweilerhof to Mückenhäuserhof near Ibersheim sometime between
1685 and 1705. He was probably living at Mückenhäuserhof when Hans Stauffer (b. 1644) of
nearby Alsheim referred to his cousin “Daniel Stauffer” in 1705/1706 his day book. Hans Stauffer
(b. 1644) of Alsheim referred to in his day book in 1705/1706 that "cousin" Daniel Stauffer was hired
by him and promised as wages 15 thalers, a smock and half a gulden (earnest money). He also wrote
that his "cousin" Daniel Stauffer had "money lying with me" 31 guldens and later 28 guldens. Daniel
Stauffer and Samuel Bayer were the temporary tenants at Mückenhäuserhof near Alsheim on 29 Aug
1710.18 Daniel owned one field of farmland and one meadow, no house, no vineyards, no woods,
no fortune, no debts and no cattle in 1710. He apparently married secondly, the widowed mother
of Hans Jacob Brubacher (b. 1692), sometime after about1698. Hans Jacob Brubacher was one of
the tenants at Mückenhäuserhof in 1729 with his step-brother Christian Stauffer. On 14 Aug 1721
a grant of probate was made for the inheritance for his son Christian Stauffer and step-son Jacob
Brubacher. The papers were presented by Christian Stauffer’s widow Catherina Schmitt in 1745 at
Bolanderhof to show inheritance. There were probably other papers issued to other heirs. The assets
listed in the inheritance of Christian Stauffer and Jacob Brubacher in 1721 from “their parents”
included a horse, cows, oxen, pigs, carts, crops, etc.19
51. Hans Stauffer, b. c1683. d. c1727, Mückenhäuserhof? The name of his first wife is unknown.
He married secondly, Elisabeth Risser on 10 Jun 1713 at Ellerstadt, Bayern, Germany. At the time
of his marriage he was called a widower and he and Elisabeth were both of the Mennonite sect at
Friedelsheim. Elisabeth was probably the daughter of Hans Rüsser and Verena Rüsser who were
Anabaptist refugees living at Wachenheim near Friedelsheim in 1672. Hans Stauffer does not appear
on the 1715 tenant list at Friedelsheim, but Hans Rüsser, his probable brother-in-law does. After his
marriage, Hans moved to Wartenberg, Bayern where his son Johannes was born in 1715. Hans does
not appear on the list of Mennonites living in the Kaiserslautern area in1717. He apparently moved
to Mückenhäuserhof in about 1716/1717 to join his father Daniel who was a tenant there. He may
have died by 1727 as that is when his brother Christian Stauffer returned from Mannheim to take over
the tenancy at Mückenhäuserhof. Hans’ son Johannes wrote in his Bible record that he was born in
Wartenberg in 1715 but was raised on the Mückenhäuserhof. Another son Christian wrote in his
Bible that he was from Mückenhäuserhof when he married Barbara Kunzi in November 1730 at
Alsheim. In 1739, Hans’ brother Daniel wrote a letter from Alsheim to the local authorities and
mentioned that he was the guardian of some minor children. Daniel may have been referring to the
younger children of his brother Hans. Hans probably lived at Friedelsheim from about 1706 to 1713
and then at Wartenberg from about 1714 to 1716 and then at Mückenhäuserhof from about 1716 to
1727. 
Daniel Stauffer
 
228 51. Hans Stauffer, b. c1683. d. c1727, Mückenhäuserhof?

The name of his first wife is unknown.

He married secondly, Elisabeth Risser on 10 Jun 1713 at Ellerstadt, Bayern, Germany.

At the time of his marriage he was called a widower and he and Elisabeth were both of the Mennonite sect at
Friedelsheim. Elisabeth was probably the daughter of Hans Rüsser and Verena Rüsser who were
Anabaptist refugees living at Wachenheim near Friedelsheim in 1672. Hans Stauffer does not appear
on the 1715 tenant list at Friedelsheim, but Hans Rüsser, his probable brother-in-law does. After his
marriage, Hans moved to Wartenberg, Bayern where his son Johannes was born in 1715. Hans does
not appear on the list of Mennonites living in the Kaiserslautern area in1717. He apparently moved
to Mückenhäuserhof in about 1716/1717 to join his father Daniel who was a tenant there. He may
have died by 1727 as that is when his brother Christian Stauffer returned from Mannheim to take over
the tenancy at Mückenhäuserhof. Hans’ son Johannes wrote in his Bible record that he was born in
Wartenberg in 1715 but was raised on the Mückenhäuserhof. Another son Christian wrote in his
Bible that he was from Mückenhäuserhof when he married Barbara Kunzi in November 1730 at
Alsheim. In 1739, Hans’ brother Daniel wrote a letter from Alsheim to the local authorities and
mentioned that he was the guardian of some minor children. Daniel may have been referring to the
younger children of his brother Hans. Hans probably lived at Friedelsheim from about 1706 to 1713
and then at Wartenberg from about 1714 to 1716 and then at Mückenhäuserhof from about 1716 to
1727. 
Hans Stauffer
 
229 Davis, "Stauffer/Stouffer part 2"

He was an Anabaptist and lived at Abnit, Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland. He was in hidiing in 1596. He was in hiding at that time to escape the usual punishment levied on Anabaptists. He apparently got off easy, as his sons, Hans and Ulrich, who were living on his estate at the time only had to pay a fine for their fathers' Anabaptist Activities.  
Hans Stauffer
 
230 From Davis, pp 166-167 (PDF pp 170-171)

514. Jacob Stauffer, b. 1712. d. 1775, Donegal Township, Lancaster County. He married
Magdalena Hess (28 Mar 1717-1784), daughter of Hans and Magdalena Hess. He arrived in
Philadelphia, age 20 on the ship "Pink Plaisance” on 20 Sep 1732 with a large group of Mennonites
including Daniel Stauffer, his probable brother. He warranted 300 acres of land in Warwick
Township next to John Brubaker on 3 Apr 1738, which he patented on 5 Jun 1746. He bought 140
½ acres in Warwick Township from Lawrence Hoff on 23 Apr 1747. On 22 Sep 1772 Abraham
Stauffer of Warwick Township and his wife Barbara sold to Christian Stauffer of Warwick Township
part of the tract of 140 ½ acres in Warwick which Jacob, his father bought from Lawrence Hoff. On
18 Dec 1747 he was called Jacob Stauffer Sr. when he, John Stauffer (his brother) and Barbara
Stauffer (Christian’s widow) were the administrators of his brother Christian’s estate at Warwick
Township with Jacob Stauffer Jr (probably his cousin and younger than he), John Brubaker Jr and
Abraham Meyer as bondsmen. On 11 Jul 1748 he sold 188 acres of his patented 300 acres (5 Jun
1746) to Jacob Musselman, the elder. In 1756 he bought land in Warwick Township as tenants in
common with his nephew John Stauffer (1734-1799). He lived at Warwick Township from 1734 to
1768. He was taxed at Warwick Township as a miller on 300 acres in 1758. He bought land in Mt.
Joy Township on 12 Feb 1765 from John Wilkin and Jacob “the Elder” and his wife Magdalena of
Donegal Township this land to Christian Whitmore of Rapho Township. He was of Warwick
Township when he bought 217 acres in Donegal Township from Samuel and Mary Smith in 1768.
The Donegal land was adjacent to the land of the late Christian Stauffer. He was taxed at Donegal
Township from 1769 to 1775. Apparently part of his Donegal Township land was in Mt. Joy
Township as he was also taxed on 250 acres at Mt. Joy Township in 1769 and 1770. In his estate
papers, he was sometimes referred to as of Donegal Township and sometimes Mt. Joy Township.
In 1773 he was of Donegal Township when he and his wife Magdalena sold his 140 acres in Mt. Joy
Township to John Stauffer. His daughter Anna left a Bible record which shows Jacob Stauffer born
1714, Magdalena Stauffer born 1717, Anna Stauffer born 26 Jan 1759, Christian Martin born 1726,
David Martin born 22 Nov 1751 and the birth dates and names of the Martin children.

From article entitled "Elizabeth Township Kinsmen and Some of Their Descendants from the Time of Settlement", but Joanne K. Hoover, "Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage" vol X number 1, January, 1987;

"Jacob Stauffer took out a warrant April 3, 1738, and established a mill on the Hammer Creek adjacent to Brubaker lands (Lewis tract). He also acquired the 141-acre Lawrence Hoff tract adjacent to Christian Eby. Several deeds connect Jacob and his wife Maudlin to their gristmill and mill dam on Mill Creek." 
Jacob Stauffer
 
231 Davis, pp 189 (pdf pp 193; Davis ref #5160

Johannes Stauffer, b. 29 Mar 1754. d. 28 May 1828, Londonderry Township, Lebanon
County, Pennsylvania. A Bible record written in the 1800s in the possession of my cousin in Mesa,
Arizona states that Mary Ginder was the wife of John Stauffer of Londonderry who died in 182827.
His first guardian was Samuel Huber, then in 1772 he chose Henry Ober as his guardian28. John was
a blacksmith, perhaps learning the trade from his Uncle Henry Ober. John married Mary Ginder, the
daughter of Henry and Barbara (Graff) Guenther in about 1776, probably at Mt. Joy. The Ginder's
farm was located in Mt. Joy Township near the borders of Londonderry Township, Lebanon County
and Rapho township. During the Revolutionary War, both Henry Ginder and John Stauffer were
listed as conscientious objectors. He was fined for refusal to bear arms at Mt. Joy Township from
1783 to 1786. John was taxed at Mt. Joy from 1776 to 1801. He was listed as a Blacksmith and lived
on part of Henry Ginder's land during those years. Apparently Henry gave John 40 acres, and John
was taxed on it occasionally. John warranted 25 acres in Mt. Joy in 1797, but did not patent it. When
Henry Ginder died in 1799, his son Jacob Ginder inherited the farm. John later moved to neighboring
Londonderry township where he was first taxed in 1801. He married as his second wife Barbara (b.
1781). After the death of John Stauffer, she married Jacob Boehm on 28 May 1829 at Palmyra. In
1795, Michael Stauffer, son of John's late brother Christian, named John as his guardian. John was of Mt. Joy Township at that time according to the Orphan Court records. In 1801 Michael chose John
again as his guardian. This time John was of Londonderry Township. On 5 Apr 1817 John was a
blacksmith of Londonderry Township when he bought 24 acres in Londonderry Township from
Joseph and Mary Richards. He was living at Londonderry Township, Dauphin County in the 1800
census (01301-00301). John is buried near Campbelltown in a small cemetery on the old Risser farm.
There is currently a new subdivision of homes going up around it. My cousin David Stauffer of
Palmyra showed me the grave in 1991. The headstone is still in good condition and the name is
written Johannes Stauffer, with the dates Geboren (born) 29 Mar 1754 Gest. (died) 28 May 1828.
In his will he lists all his children and his three son-in-laws. His will states that his sons Henry and
Christian were dead, but had heirs. He does not mention his daughter Susanna, who apparently died
unmarried before 1828. Johannes is my 4th great-grandfather. 
Johannes Stauffer
 
232 Johannes Stauffer, b. 6 Aug 1715, Wartenberg, Bayern, Germany. d. Jan 1767, Warwick
Township, Lancaster County. He married Catherina Schenk, daughter of Michael and Anna
(Rasy/Rassi) Schenk in the fall of 1738. He arrived in Philadelphia on the ship "Virtuous Grace" on
24 Sep 1737 with his older brother Christian Stauffer. He warranted 194 acres next to his father-inlaw
Michael Schenk, Thomas Falkner and Christian Palmer (Balmer) which he patented on 28 Aug
1756. He was one of the administrators of his brother Christian's estate in 1747. Johannes borrowed
money on his farm in 1756 from Johannes Brubacher of Manor Township. His wife Catherine died on 29 Nov 1760, at which time he listed in his Bible all his children by her. He wrote concerning his
just deceased wife, "May God give her grace on Judgment Day. They have produced in peaceful
marriage the following children". He then lists his children with their birthdays and adds, "May God
to whom they belonged before they were, and who through His eternal goodness permitted them to
exist make them an example of His mercy. May He bless them and their descendants and permit their
seed to possess the gates of their enemies". He also wrote in his Bible that he was born at
Wartenberg but raised on the Mückenhäuserhof. Johannes married secondly another Catherine. He
had two daughters by his second wife that are not listed in the Bible. Johannes died in January of
1767, as he wrote a codicil to his will on 2 Jan 1767 and his will was proved 17 Jan 1767. He was
a Mennonite and lived at Warwick Township. His widow Catherine married secondly Hans Oyer
(Eyer), by 23 May 1768 when John Oyer and his wife Catherine of Earl Township quit claimed their
part of John Stauffer’s land to Christian Erb. In the orphan court of Lancaster dated 6 Aug 1787, it
showed that John Eyer (Oyer) was late of Warwick Township and his widow Catherine was now the
wife of Peter Delebaugh (of Londonderry Township, Dauphin County). On 7 May 1767, his
executors Michael Shenk, miller of Lebanon Township and Jacob Erb of Warwick Township sold
his 194 acres to Christian Erb of Warwick Township for 1,100 pounds, because John’s two oldest
sons Christian and Jacob Stauffer did not want the land. Johannes’ grandfather Daniel Stauffer
(1657-1721) was the tenant at Mückenhäuserhof in 1706 and 1710 and after 1721 his uncle Christian
Stauffer (c1695-11 Jul 1743) was the tenant. 
Johannes Stauffer
 
233 From Davis, pp 192 (PDF pp196)

John Stauffer, b. 14 Jan 1781, Mt. Joy Township. d. 27 Nov 1852, Annville Township.
He was first taxed at Londonderry in 1801 as John Stauffer Jr, a single man. In 1806 he was listed
as a single man and then his name was crossed out. That is probably the year he was married. He
was a blacksmith. He was married to Margaret (b. 1784). His children were baptized at the Salem Evangelical Church in Lebanon. He was baptized as an adult as “Johannes Stauffer”, age 52 on 16
May 1834 at the Salem Evangelical Church in Lebanon. He was living at Lebanon Township in the
1820 census (010010-40010). He was living at Annville Township in the 1830 census, age 40-50
with his wife age 40-50, 1 son age 0-5, 1 daughter age 0-5, 1 daughter age 5-10, 1 daughter, age 10-
15, 1 daughter age 15-20, 1 male age 20-30 and 1 female age 20-30. He was living at Annville
Township in the 1840 census, age 50-60 with his wife age 50-60 and one daughter age 10-15 and one
daughter age 15-20. 
John Stauffer
 
234 from Davis, pp198 (PDF pp 202)

5212. John Stauffer, b. 12 Mar 1741, Rohrbach, Baden, Germany. d. 1825, Beaver Township,
Columbiana County (now Mahoning County) , Ohio. He married Elizabeth Winkle on 4 Apr 1769
at Lancaster Town, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The administrator of his estate at Columbiana
County on 18 Mar 1825 was Abraham Stauffer. In 1768, the executors of his father’s estate
transferred his father’s land in Manor Township, Lancaster County to him and in 1772, John and his
wife Elizabeth sold the Manor Township land to John’s brother Abraham Stauffer. He was probably
the John taxed at Manor Township (on his late father’s land) in 1763. He was taxed at Donegal
Township in 1769 on 150 acres and in 1770 on 200 acres. He was living at Donegal Township when
he made a bond for 200 3/4 acres in Donegal Township to John Hertzler and Jacob Ebersole of
Donegal Township, guardians of Abraham Stauffer on 20 Mar 1769. Apparently the land came back
to John as he was living at Donegal Township in 1770 when he and his wife Elizabeth sold 200 3/4
acres to Martin Nisley of Donegal Township (his step-father). The 200 3/4 acres was adjacent to
John’s uncle Jacob Stauffer’s land. In 1771 he and his wife Elizabeth were living at Donegal
Township when they sold 33 acres in Donegal to Martin Nisley of Mt. Joy Township. He was taxed
at Manor Township, Lancaster County as a renter from 1771 to 1783. He was of Manor Township
when he bought 4 acres adjacent to his other land in Manor Township from John Stayman on 31 Oct
1781. He was taxed back in Donegal in 1783. He was living at Donegal in 1783 when he bought 53
acres and 70 acres in Rapho Township from Jacob and Elizabeth Cassell. He was living at Rapho
Township in 1785 when he and his wife Elizabeth sold 53 acres in Rapho to Isaac Hershey of
Hempfield Township. He was taxed at Rapho Township in 1783 on 50 acres and was last taxed there
in 1786. He was living at Rapho Township on 17 Jan 1787 when he and his wife Elizabeth sold land
in Rapho Township to Abraham Stauffer of Washington County, Maryland. John was of Tyrone
Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania when he bought 132 acres on Jacob’s Creek from John
Stephenson on 20 May 1789. He and his wife Elizabeth were of Tyrone Township, Fayette County
when he sold 132 acres on Jacob’s Creek in Tyrone Township to James Steret on 22 May 1789. In
the December term court of common pleas in 1798 he had a judgement against him of $100. In the
1790 census he was living at Fayette County (2-2-4). He and his brother Abraham bought 43 acres
together in Tyrone Township on 11 Jun 1793 from Moses Smith. On 10 Sep 1801, John and his wife
Elizabeth lived at Dunbar Township when he and his brother Abraham and his wife Ann of Tyrone
Township sold the 43 acres in Tyrone Township to Jacob Baltzly. John and his wife Elizabeth were
of New Haven, Dunbar Township, Fayette County on 10 Aug 1803 when they sold lot #8 in New
Haven to James Rogers. John bought lot #8 from Isaac Meason earlier. He may have been one of
the 4 John Stovers taxed at South Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland County in 1798. He was
taxed at Dunbar Township from 1799 to 1809 on no land. In the 1800 census he was living at Dunbar
Township (31001-01101). He is not found in records at Fayette County after 1809. He was living
at Beaver Township, Columbiana County, Ohio over age 45 with no others in his household in 1820
near Henry Stouffer of Green Township, Columbiana County. 
John Stauffer
 
235 from Davis, pp. 216 (PDF pp 220)

52147. John W. Stauffer, b. 10 Sep 1788. d. 22 Feb 1852, Fayette County. He wrote his will
on 9 Feb 1849 and it was proved 26 Mar 1852. He was married to Catherine Loucks (b. 1792) in
about 1812. He left his farm of 108 acres in East Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland County to
his wife Catherine and his real estate in Tyrone Township to his daughter Sarah Kister, wife of
Solomon Keister. He left $200 to build a new meeting house on Jacob’s Creek next to the land “that
I gave my wife”. He left $50 to the Mennonites to expand the graveyard where “my dear children
are buried”. The executor of his will was Samuel Zuck and son-in-law Solomon Keister. The
witnesses to the will were Joshua Strickler and John F. Strickler. On 8 Nov 1813 he bought 45 acres
in Dunbar Township from Henry and Barbara Smith and he was living at East Huntingdon Township
when he sold that land with his wife Catherine on 4 Sep 1818 to Stewart Whiteside. He was taxed
as a fuller with mills at Dunbar Township, Fayette County from 1812 to 1816 on 40 acres. He was
living at East Huntingdon Township on 20 Apr 1817 when he sold his land on Jacob’s Creek in
Tyrone Township to Abraham Stauffer Jr. The Jacob Creek’s land was sold to him by his father.
He was probably the John Stouffer living at Dunbar Township, Fayette County as a young unmarried
man in the 1810 census (00100-00000) next to Christian Stauffer. He lived at East Huntingdon
Township, Westmoreland County in the 1820 census (000010-40010) next to Peter Loucks. On 20
Feb 1824 his father sold him 30 acres in Bullskin Township which he sold on 27 Mar 1824 to his
brother Martin. He lived at East Huntingdon Township in 1830 age 40-50 with is wife age 30-40,
1 female age 5-10, 1 female age 0-5 and 1 male age 10-15. He was taxed at Tyrone Township from
1833 and 1834 on 47 acres and a distillery. He was taxed as a non-resident at Tyrone Township on
47 acres from 1835 to 1837. He was taxed at Tyrone Township on 127 acres from 1838 to 1840 and
then from 1741 to 1842 on 185 acres and then from 1843 to 1852 on about 174 acres and mills. He
was living at Tyrone Township in the 1840 census, age 50-60 with his wife age 50-60 and 2 females
age 15-20, 1 female age 5-10, 2 males 15-20 and 1 male 5-10. He was living at Tyrone Township,
age 61 in the 1850 census with his wife Catherine, age 58 with no children in his household. His
farm was valued at $7,000 in 1850. It’s not clear from the census report if all of the females listed
in the 1820 census reports are his daughters as they were not listed in the 1830 census. It’s possible
that three daughters died by 1830. John’s widow Catherine was age 67 living with Solomon Keister,
age 44 and Keister’s wife Elizabeth, age 31 and his children. Elizabeth apparently was Solomon’s
second wife and possibly another daughter of John’s. 
John W. Stauffer
 
236 From "From "Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage" magazine, Volume X, Number 1, January, 1987; article by Jeanne Hoover, "Elizabeth Township Kinsmen and Some of Their Descendants from the Time of Settlement"

Peter "Inherited his father's dwelling, gristmill, sawmill, and three other contiguous tracts" 
Peter Stauffer
 
237 from Davis, pp 193 (PDF pp 197)

Veronica Stauffer, b. 19 Apr 1784, Mt. Joy Township, Lancaster County. She died on
16 Jan 1860, Lebanon, Wayne County. Ohio. She married on 23 Sep 1806 at Lebanon County,
Pennsylvania, Philip Kettering, son of Johan Franz and Barbara (Houch) Kettering. He was born 17
Feb 1781 in Sumner County, Tennessee. They were married on 23 Sep 1806 at Lebanon, Lebanon
County. Pennsylvania. They moved to Ohio in the 1830's and took all of their children with them
except for Samuel who stayed in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania.

Veronica's sister, Barbara Stauffer (Lang) is the ancestor of Richard Davis, the author of the Stauffer Book.  
Veronica Stauffer
 
238 Ancestral File Number: LH6H-ZB
REFN: 30614
1 NAME Sarah /Strother/


[William Strother 1726 Descendants.ged]

Sarah, b. Dec. 11, 1760, m. Richard Taylor, son of Zachary Taylor andElizabeth Lee, son of James Taylor (II) and Martha Thompson, son of JamesTaylor, immigrant, and 1st wife, -------. He wasa Lt. Col. in the 2ndVA Regt in the Revolution. Children:
i. Hancock Taylor,m. (1) EIizabeth Hord; (2) Annah Lewis.
ii. Zachary, b. Nov.24, 1784; m. Margaret Smith; was twelfth Presidentof the U. S.
iii. George
iv. William Dabney
v. Richard
vi. Joseph Pannill, m. Evaline McLean.
vii. Elizabeth Lee, m. John Gibson Taylor.
viii.Sarah, m. French Strother Gray, son of Col. George Gray, son ofGeorge Gray and Mary, dau of James Strother.
ix.Emily, m. John S. Allison.
(Owen, William Strother of Va, 1898, p. 19).


Source from Hills/Hatcher Family Tree on World Connect

NOTE: a lot of information in this file is not proven
-Dale A. Updike 
Sarah Pannill Dabney STROTHER
 
239 Ancestral File Number: T3CG-GJ Ann Margaret Mackall TAYLOR
 
240 Ancestral File Number: 10JM-D0C Blandine TAYLOR
 
241 From Thomas Parrish, November 15, 1998

Danforth was a husbandman all his life, and proud of it. He came to Stoddard, New Hampshire, to live in his early twenties, around 1792, on horseback with his first son Danforth, Jr., riding with him and baby Mary in her mother's arms. He had bought Lot 7, Range 12(?) on the "Road That Leads to Keene" from Theodore French of Dunstable, on 30 April, 1792. There he prepared a log cabin home for his family, set in already well-cleared land and with the fall work done. It was not the sort of home Tabitha Taylor had left in Dunstable, but for those times in Stoddard it was luxurious and showed the care he had put into it in nearly two years of making his settlement. Neighbors had assisted him raise a great barn for his stock and they had helped some with his first harvest.

"Squire" Taylor, as he came to be called, found the cabin too small for his growing family, bought the adjoining lot from Josiah Fletcher of Chelmsford (a distant cousin of his wife's) in 1796, and about 1800 built a house which stll stands on the Keene Road, or as it is now called, the Old Sullivan Road in the lot containing Taylor Pond. That pond derived its name from Squire Taylor because he lived nearby and owned all the land around it.

Danforth Taylor was a well educated man when he came to Stoddard and he saw to it that his children attended the school by the Samuel Wilson place and "got their lessons." They learned to work, too, the boys in the fields and later in the rake mill at the outlet of his pond, the girls in housekeeping with their mother.

Squire Danforth found time to serve his town as selectman and on the school board; he was 11 times a representative for Stoddard.

He died after a long life and a marriage that lasted for 68 years, and is buried at Old Stoddard Cemetery on Dow Hill.

Tabitha died at age 89, and is buried with her husband in Old Stoddard Cemetery on Dow Hill.  
Danforth Taylor
 
242 Ancestral File Number: T3CG-9N Daughter TAYLOR
 
243 Ancestral File Number: LH6J-GV Elizabeth Lee TAYLOR
 
244 NOTE: a lot of information in this file is not proven
-Dale A. Updike 
Emily Taylor
 
245 Ancestral File Number: LH6J-NW Emily Richard TAYLOR
 
246 Ancestral File Number: LH6J-1M George TAYLOR
 
247 NOTE: a lot of information in this file is not proven
-Dale A. Updike 
Hancock Taylor
 
248 NOTE: a lot of information in this file is not proven
-Dale A. Updike 
Joseph Pannill Taylor
 
249 Ancestral File Number: 1RQW-05M Margaret Smith TAYLOR
 
250 The marker on this map is the original home of Margaret's father, President Zachary Taylor, near Baton Rouge, La. We do not have information as to her exact burial site. Margaret Smith TAYLOR
 

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