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101 information from Edwin Stanton Spencer Jeremiah Cook
 
102 This information is from Edwin Stanton Spencer Jeremiah Cook, Sr.
 
103 1860 Census sheet 69 line 34, New Alexandria Post Office, Loyalhanna Township, Westmoreland County, Pa (National Archives Publication M653, roll 1195 John Cook
 
104 Ancestral File Number: 3DS7-1J Eleazer CUSHMAN
 
105 Ancestral File Number: SCZB-ZX Elizabeth CUSHMAN
 
106 Ancestral File Number: R4JD-1J James CUSHMAN
 
107 Ancestral File Number: D1S3-42 Thomas CUSHMAN
 
108 ABIGAIL AND ROYAL HAD 14 CHILDREN ABIGAIL B DABY
 
109 Ancestral File Number: MJMN-ZG Ephraim DELANO
 
110 Ancestral File Number: B683-D2 Sara (Sallie) DELANO
 
111 Ancestral File Number: FHM9-0N Warenne DELANO
 
112 Ancestral File Number: SCZC-03 Warenne DELANO
 
113 Born on the ship en route to America when her mother was eighteen years old Ida Dudock
 
114 Ida was born en route to America in 1903 or 1904.

From Jules Dudock autobiography:

"My father had rented a small apartment at 54 Jefferson Street on the lower east side of New York City. A cold water flat with no heat, but a coal stove in the kitchen, the toilet was in the hall, and it was shared by four families living on the same floor, three flights up from the street. My father Samuel Dudock, his wife Anna and new born baby girl named Ida and also my mother?s two brothers Sam and Max Polansky all moved into this small apartment.
They were very happy to be here, even though there was no money to speak of. They were not afraid to face hardship, courage was their inheritance. Sam was fourteen years old and Max eleven full of hope and ambition, the year was 1904 and Simon was back there in Germany out of danger of the gangsters back in Colonia, Romania. They missed him and wanted him with them in New York too."
 
Ida Dudock
 
115 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
116 Pioneered to Pennsylvania, with Palatines imported on board the ship, the Winter Galley, Edward Paynter, Commander, arrived Sep 5, 1738, from Rotterdam, but last from Deal.

Number of records in Huntingdon Co. between 1765 and 1795 of him as Johann Heinrich Ashbaugh and Eschbach and as Henry Ashbaugh and Ashbach.

His will was filed in Huntingdon, PA on April 2, 1761 and probated on March 11, 1789 and mentions his wife Mary Elizabeth.

Moved from York Co., when very mature, about 1774.

The ancestral name of Ashbaugh was Eschenbach, the family name of Wolfran von Eschenbach who lived in or near the town of Eschenbach near the Austrian border of what was West Germany. The family name means "a bach or brook running through a grove of ash trees". The name Eschenbach was shortened to Eschbach by Johann Heinrich Eschbach when he emigrated to America, landing at the Port of Philadelphia in 1738. The name Eschbach was later anglicized to Ashbaugh. Known to outsiders as "Pennsylvania Dutch", which is derived from Deutschland (Germany), the Ashbaughs moved west to Armstrong County, Butler County, Clarion County and elsewhere. 
Johann Heinrich Eschbach
 
117 Fred Shields Ewing
Delmont

Fred Shields Ewing, 86, of Delmont, died Thursday, July 5, 2001, in Redstone
Highlands Care Center, Greensburg. He was born Feb. 2, 1915, in Delmont, the
son of James Herbert Ewing and Mary Madge Shields. Prior to retirement, he
had been a chemist at the U.S. Steel Zinc Plant in Donora. He had a master's
degree in education from the University of Pittsburgh and had also taught
science, math, English and Latin at Delmont High School. He was a member of
the Delmont Presbyterian Church and a member of the J.R. Ewing American
Legion of Delmont. During World War II, he served as a captain in the Army.
In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his loving wife of
60 years, Mary Margaret Alcorn Ewing. He is survived by two daughters, Madge
E. Carpenter of New York and Alice E. Cathey and her husband, Charles, of
Pittsburgh; a granddaughter, Jennifer E. Carpenter of Madison, Wis.; and a
niece, Sally A. Snyder of Redstone Highlands, Greensburg. There will be no
visitation. A memorial service will be held Monday, July 9, at 2:30 p.m. at
the Redstone Highlands Chapel, 6 Garden Center Drive, Greensburg 15601, with
the Rev. Steven Heintz officiating. Memorial contributions may be made to
Redstone Highlands. Arrangements are being handled by the BASH-NIED FUNERAL
HOME, Delmont. 
Fred Shields Ewing
 
118 In "Biographical Annals of Lebanon County (Beers, 1904) the name is spelled "Franzler" Philip E. Fernsler
 
119 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
120 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
121 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
122 Henry Ginder, b. 30 May 1730, Neunkirchen.2 d. 8 May
1799, Mt. Joy Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He arrived
in Philadelphia on 15 Sep 1749 on the ship "Phoenix". He warranted
land in Lancaster County in 1750. He was married at Lancaster
Trinity Lutheran Church on 16 Oct 1753 to Barbara Graff, daughter
of Hans and Veronica (Neukomm) Graff. She was christened on 2 Oct
1729 at Rafz, Zurich, Switzerland. They were Anabaptists. 
Henry Ginder
 
123 Alfred K. Griffin, age 36, married 25 October 1854, at Danvers, to Mrs.
Nancy A. Richardson, age 26. She was born in New York. Her maiden
name was Lewis. Her father was David Lewis. His father was Joseph
Griffin. This was her second marriage and his first. They were married
by James Fletcher, Pastor of 3d. Congregational Church. He was a
Gardener by occupation, and his residence at time of marriage was
Danvers. Her residence was Middleton. 
ALFRED KIMBALL GRIFFIN
 
124 Samuel was born July 31, 1860 He and Anne Joy Griffin had 9 children. 7
boys and 2 girls. He also had a son, Eddie Griffin and a girl who spent
time with the 9 children. Not sure if he was married before. Although
I found a girl hemight have been married to at 19 named Lara from Maine.
It listed him as living in Maine working as a lumberman. 
SAMUEL ELLIS GRIFFIN
 
125 William Married Susan Redlington in 1768 WILLIAM GRIFFIN
 
126 According to the 1930 Census, George W. Grimm lived with Marjorie at 59 South Maple Avenue, East Orange, NJ.

With them lived their daughter Nancy, age 4 and their son Gifford, age 2. Also in the household were George W. Grimm's father, George W.Grimm Sr., age 54, his brother Robert, age 24, and sister Catherine, age 17.

Of note is that his mother, Jessie Maude Bishop is not in the household. This could mean that she is deceased, or that they were divorced.

George W.Grimm,Sr's occupation is listed as "Companion for a Blind Man".
Robert Grimm's occupation is listed as "Civil Engineer".

George Grimm died at the Lincroft Inn, Lincroft, NJ. He and a number of friends (including the son-in-law of the minister) went to the Inn after church one Sunday and he died at his meal.

Listed in "The Manual of the Legislature of New Jersy, 1872-1980

George W. Grimm, Jr. was the next-door neighbor of Bernard Halbstein; George's grandson Peter married Bernard's daughter, Amy.  
George W. Grimm, Jr.
 
127 According to the 1910 Census, Lived with Jessie, his wife, and his two sons, George W. Jr and Robert. Also listed in the household was his mother-in-law, Catharine Bishop.

Matches in Passenger Lists: Germans to America


Geo. Grimm found in:

Germans to America, 1875-1888
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Occupation Code: Dealer
Country: Germany
Last Residence: Unknown
Final Destination: USA
Purpose for Travel: Staying in USA, but not a citizen of USA
Mode of Travel: Steerage
Port of Embarkation: Bremen & Southampton
Manifest ID Number: 37298
Ship's Name: Salier
Date of Arrival: May 02, 1883 Data Introduction
Geo Grimm found in:

Germans to America, 1875-1888
Age: 27
Gender: Male
Occupation Code: Boat Maker
Country: Switzerland
Last Residence: Unknown
Final Destination: New York
Port of Embarkation: Antwerp
Manifest ID Number: 40494
Ship's Name: Waesland
Date of Arrival: Jun. 08, 1888 Data Introduction
George Grimm found in:

Germans to America, 1875-1888
Age: 24
Gender: Male
Occupation Code: Shoemaker
Country: Germany
Last Residence: Unknown
Final Destination: USA
Purpose for Travel: Staying in USA, but not a citizen of USA
Mode of Travel: Steerage
Port of Embarkation: Havre
Manifest ID Number: 80080
Captain's Name: Joucle
Ship's Name: Amerique
Date of Arrival: Aug. 19, 1880 Data Introduction  
George Washington Grimm
 
128 Hans Peter Günther. b. 8 Apr 1673, Fischbach, Dudweiler,
Saarland, Germany. He was buried at Neunkirchen, Saarbruchen on 27
Apr 1694. He was a baker and a brewer by trade. He married Luisa
Burckhardt on 27 Apr 1694. She was of Neumunster bei Ottweiler,
Saarland and her father was a citizen and tailor of Neumunster. 
Hans Peter Günther
 
129 Jacob Günther, b. c1697. He was married to Anna Maria
Rosser/Rasser. She died 11 Feb 1746 and was buried at Fischbach,
age 44 years. Jacob married second Susanna Becker at Weidenthal,
Pfalz, Germany on 8 Apr 1748. She was born 6 Dec 1722 at
Weidenthal and died at Neunkirchen 6 Feb 1788. On 31 Jul 1734 on
a list of town strangers at Dudweiler it lists a Wilhelm Rasser the
"Hammerschmied zu Geislautern" with Johan Jacob Guenther1. This
Wilhelm Rasser, blacksmith of Geislautern may be related in same
way to Maria Rasser, wife of Jacob Guenther. 
Jacob Günther
 
130
Written by David Halbstein, 12/2004

Bernard Mark Halbstein was born in July, 1910, the second son of David Lawrence Halbstein and Edna Hershoff. His parents were immigrants from Poland, Latvia or Russia; they spoke Yiddish in their household. His father was a laborer in a shoe factory in Lynn, when they moved to Chelsea he opened a bakery where he sold cakes, cookies and other confections.

During this time, Edna would use the large bakery ovens to bake Challah, the ceremonial Jewish bread used on Shabbat and other occasions. Because she used her hands instead of measuring cups and her eyes and other senses to judge if the dough was "just right", she often had leftover loaves which were put in the bakery window. Family legend has it that her bread was so popular that she was soon baking more than 100 loaves per week for the local community.

As a young man he played the saxophone in an orchestra, playing at local weddings and bar-mitzvahs in and around the Lynn, Ma. area.

He graduated from Boston University School of Medicine, and completed his residency in Cincinnatti, Ohio, with a specialty in Orthopedic Surgery.

His sisters all agree that, even though Bernie was not the eldest, he was the one to be respected in the family. They recount stories of growing up and being taught that Bernie was a very special person, and that they should listen to him, respect him, and seek his advice and counsel.

He enlisted in the Army at the outset of WWII; he said that his eyesight should have excluded him but he convinced the medical examiner to allow him to join. He was a surgeon with the 41st Evacuation Hospital which landed at Omaha Beach, France on June 13, 1944. He served in the Army in Europe for four years

In 1949 he married Anna Jean Alcorn at the home of his sister, Madeline, in Manchester, MA., they settled in Long Branch, NJ and later moved to Oceanport, NJ.

During the 1950's and early 1960's his work was primarily focused on the national polio epidemic. People would travel from great distances to be seen by Dr. Halbstein and his partner, Dr. Nick Ransahoff. Each day he would shower and disinfect his hands before leaving the office, taking no chances that he might bring the disease home to his own family.

In the late 1960's or early 1970's, he went to London to study total hip replacement; bringing this knowledge back to the US and making joint replacement a focal point of his practice. Dr. Ransahoff had long since died, and Dr. Halbstein had a very well known orthopedic practice in Long Branch with Dr. Otto Lehman and Dr. Edwin Otis.

He was interested in boating and fishing, and later took up golf, which he played every chance he could get. He was also an avid gardener; tending to his vegetable garden every summer and producing bushels of tomatoes, cucumbers, and other salad greens.

Shortly after the death of his wife, Anna Jean, in 1976, Bernie moved from Oceanport to Interlaken, NJ, where he lived out his days. He travelled often, enjoying his sem-retirement in places like San Francisco, Paris, Tokyo and Israel.

He retired from surgery in the mid 1980's but remained active as a physician and a consultant for his existing patients. In the early 1990's he was stricken with cancer which he battled successfully for several years. He remained noble and dignified as the disease slowly gained on him, and when he knew there was no more hope for a meaningful recovery elected to discontinue treatment and go home. Because he was so ill, he went instead to the home of his daughter, Amy, where he lived for only a few weeks. His family was with him until his death in November, 1991; everyone was glad to have the opportunity to say good-bye to such a quiet, distinguished and honorable man. He was completely devoted to his family, his sisters, his patients and to the art of healing.

Dr. Halbstein left an indelible mark on everyone he came in contact with. Years after his death, I still encounter people who, upon hearing my name, ask if I am related to him. "I am walking today because of your father", they tell me, or something similar. I have never met anyone who has had less than a kind word or deep admiration for Bernard M. Halbstein.

From a eulogy written by his brother-in-law, Richard Vallon, 1991:

Everything you've heard about Bernie is true. He was indeed a giant in his profession and a tower of strength, comfort and support to his loving family, Jean, Amy, and David. He was devoted to his parents, brother, and four sisters. If I were not his brother-in-law, I would like to have been his brother.

Some of our most memorable summers were those spent with the Halbstein family. Can you imagine anyone inviting his sister, brother-in-law, and five children to spend an entire week at your home every year? Bernie could and did. In retrospect, we ecame an integral part of this beautiful, cohesive family.

Bernie brought new meaning to the word "mensch".

My greatest joy was connecting to that spark of humor in his dignified nature and make him laugh.

Bernie would not want us to mourn him, but to remember him. Goodbye, Bernie, you will live in our hearts forever.

REMINISCENCE OF THE 41ST:
Dr. Bernard M. Halbstein

I was transferred to the 41st in Ft. Bragg from the 11th Airborne at Camp McCall, N.C. Made many friends among the officers, some of whom have left this world—Arthur Post, Frank Pittman, Harry Alpert, Lester Shapiro, George Bush, Van Hammett, Tommy Williams, Wetchler, Nenner, McCook, Abe Friedman. I could go on and on. I still have a vivid picture of each of these fine guys before me. Tommy Williams and Nick Alfano were close friends throughout Tennessee maneuvers and in the E.T.O.

We didn't know which theater we were bound for, but I had a Smith and Wesson with me just in case. The trip on the Queen Mary was smooth, and we were blessedly unaware of the dangers which lurked in the Atlantic. We made the crossing in 3 ½ days.

Dursley was a pleasant interlude and has nostalgic memories. I had a very enjoyable ten days leave and visited Edinburgh with Jim Bogle. I'll not forget it. I was billeted in Dursley in a home with George Nenner. We slept in a feather bed and had hot bricks for foot warmth – and we shared the same bed!

We hardly knew what we were going to meet when we embarked on the James I McKay from Lands' End. Wading off an LCI to Omaha Beach on 13 June was an experience, although we were still oblivious at the time of the carnage of the previous few days.

We got busy in LeMolay and our surgical volume was tremendous. I recall trying to speak French to the visiting kids, and was so tongue-tied that I gave it up, although I had three years of high school French. I did better when we were in Paris later. The Falaise Gap was a worry to us – many of our group dug foxholes. I was a fatalist and couldn't be bothered. It is a helpful philosophy in a war. That's when our hospital was bombed, and it was the only time.

Promoted to Major in August '44. Can't forget Grauel and McDuff – two superb assistants at surgery.

Paris, the day after its recapture, was fascinating. Then, how can we forget Hanmut, Belgium, and the reception of the townspeople? They invited some of us to their homes, and had printed dinner menus.

The winter in Maastricht was uneventful. Much surgery and lots of bridge – some pretty sharp players. Christmas in Maastricht. We were close to Bastogne and the German breakthrough, but were not called upon to function.

Crossed the Roer River in February, 1945, and experience Aachen, Muenchen-Gladbach, Rheidt and finally crossed the Rhine over a pontoon bridge. Our activity in Germany, in Dorsten, etc. is vague in my memory, except when we were poised south of Hamburg to become part of the 18th Airborne Corps to invade Denmark and Norway. We celebrated V.E. Day there on May 9. We ate venison, courtesy of our own sharpshooters.

Then came the long wait. We became a temporary hospital occupation force in Westphalia until we camped more permanently in Bad Nauheim with a short transfer of our unit to Marburg where we again were put to work, with plenty of waiting time back in Bad Nauheim until our homeward-bound numbers were reached.

We did a lot of traveling. Nick Alfano and I visited Rome, Naples, and Capri. We got along fine with his knowledge of the language. (Flying low thru the Alps in a DC-3 was scary). I was sent on a two-week course to Stockholm, by recommendation of Col. Harrell, where a group of officers from various outfits were treated royally. My orders read: “By order of General Eisenhower”. Here, we learned to drink Aquavit – noted for absence of hangover. A side trip to Copenhagen, where I was the only American (British Occupation).

There was a return visit to Paris and London, which looked much different. The children were back in London. Paris was like nothing had ever happened to it.

We embarked for home from LeHavre on a Liberty Ship with no ballast, and I was seasick most of the time. I had lost weight and looked pale, and was really worried how I would look to my parents. We were deviated from debarking in New York because of Navy Day and had to head for Norfolk. Well, what the heck; it was the U.S.A. and that was all that mattered!

After the war, I corresponded with Rene Slater Ward and Jim Bogle. I visited Bogle in Littleton, N.H. I went back to Omaha Beach and London twice.

The cemetery in Normandy was a heartbreaking sight.

In Lemolay, I visited the Mayor and showed him our 41st book. He remembered us, and he gave me a present. St. Lo was a thriving city and completely restored from the ravages of the war.

My four years in the Service was like an unreal dream and memories keep cropping up, but it's wonderful to have someone like Jay Schwartz to keep them alive.








 
Bernard M. Halbstein
 
131 There is a lot of speculation and many stories about David Halbstein's origins, and his emigration to the United States. According to his Petition for Naturalization held on file at the National Archives and dated 1911, he departed on February 20, 1904 from Hamburg, Germany abord the steamship "Pretoria", and arrived at the Port of New York on March 6, 1904.

A partial transcript of his statement is as follows:

"The petition of Davis (sic) Halbstein, hereby filed, respectfully showeth:

First. My place of residence is 16 Crosby Street, Lynn, Massachusetts.

Second. My occupation is shoemaker.

Third. I was born on the 25th day of March, anno Domini 1879, at Cholom, Russia.

Fourth, I emigrated to the United States from Hamburg, Germany, on or about the 20th day of February 1904 and arrived in the United States at the port of New York, NY on the th day of March, 1904 on the vessel 'Pretoria'.

Fifth. I declared my intention to become a citizen of the united states on the 29th day of November, 1904, [in] New York, NY, in the New York cort of New York.

Sixth. I am married. My wife's name is Edna. She was born in Witebsk, Russia, and now resides at Lynn, Massachusetts.

[I have] 2 children, and the name date and place of birth, and place of residence of each of said children is as follows:

LouisJan 5, 1907|
|------ both born in Lynn, Mass
Darnet M. July 13, 1910|

Seventh. I am not a disbeliever in or opposed to organized government or a member of or affilliated with any organization or body of persons teaching a disbelief in or opposed to organized government. I am not a polygamist nor a believer in the practice of polygamy. I am attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and it is my intention to become a citizen of the United States and to renounce absolutely and forever all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, and particularly to NICHOLAS II EMPORER OF ALL THE RUSSIAS, of whom at this time I am a subject, and it is my intention to reside permanently in the United States.

Eighth. I am able to speak the English Language. "

Before 1905, Russia was an autocracy with no limitations on the authority of the Czar. But the Czarist establishment was oppressive, inept, and inadequate - especially under a feeble ruler like Nicholas II - and the allegiance of the Russian people had been quietly eroding for years. Disaffection had long been widespread among intellectuals, some of whom had become revolutionaries, but urban workers, peasants, and ethnic minorities all had their own serious grievances.

“All Russia is one vast madhouse...” - Count Witte, 1906

Russia blundered into a war with Japan which began February 8, 1904, twelve days before David's departure. No doubt he already had his passage secured, but it is likely that he was one of the disaffected cited above. It is also possible, as has been suggested by relatives, that his departure was an escape from military persecution.

It is interesting to note that Davis (David) Halbstein declaired under oath above that his birthday was March 25, 1879, but on his official Draft Card dated Sept 12, 1918, he declares his birthday to be April 10, 1881.

According to the above document, and also the 1920 Census, David Halbstein was a shoemaker, or rather, a laborer in a shoe factory. Lynn, Massachusets was a "Shoe Town", and factories were one of their biggest industries. Later, he opened a bakery and began his entrepreneurial pursuit of the American Dream.  
David Halbstein
 
132 Max and Sally married in Chelsea, Massachusetts in ....
In 1947 or 1947 they moved to Israel, where the lived for eight years. Judy and Leora were born in Israel.  
Sarah Halbstein
 
133 From Thomas Parrish, November 15, 1998:

Shadrack Hapgood, when 14 years of age, with four other boys, Thomas Barnes, aged 20; John Fay, aged 8 (or 18); and Thomas and Nathaniel Goodnow (aged 20 and 16) sailed from Gravesend, England, May 13, 1656; in the ship "Speedwell", Robert Locke, Master, arriving at Boston June 27. They were bound for Sudbury, Massachusetts, where it is probable they all had friends or relatives. Shadrack was the nephew of Peter Noyes Senior, a leader of the company that founded Sudbury. He is mentioned in Peter's will dated 1657 as being a kinsman, and Shadrack himself in 1666 mentioned when a witness in a case that he was the nephew of Peter Noyes Senior, and cousin of Peter Noyes Junior. Shadrack married Elizabeth Treadway in Sudbury, and they started raising their family there.

In the late 1660's and early 1670's, Shadrack, with eleven other men from Concord, Sudbury, and Chelmsford, petitioned the Massachusetts General Colurt for a grant of a large and irregular tract of land running in a northwesterly direction from Sudbury to Lunenberg. The records of the General Court are silent about the disposition of the petition, but those of the proprietors of the town of Stow indicate that the General Court granted the petitioners land from this tract for a new town in 1670, requiring them to improve it by 1673 and attaching other conditions. While probably not complying with all conditions, the proprietors "took up lots of 50 acres each" on both sides of the Assabet River, locating their meeting-house near the old burying yard in Stow. Before they had progressed to completion of the settlement, Philip's War between the colonists and Indians came on and the settlement probably was broken up for a time.

Immediately before the outbreak of the war in 1675, the Indidans near Quaboag, now Brookfield, expressed a disposition to treat with the English. Captain Hutchinson of Boston and Captain Wheeler of Concord, with a small party of men including Shadrack Hapgood, were sent to treat with them. Three of the Sachems promised an interview on August 2nd, 1675, at the head of Wickaboag Pond. The English went to the spot, but the Indians weren't there. The English proceeded on, but were ambushed by the indians who fired upon them, killing or mortally wounding eight of their number, including Shadrack Hapgood.  
Shadrack Hapgood
 
134 From Thomas Parrish, November 15, 1998:

Thomas Hapgood grew up in Sudbury and Concord, Massachusetts, going to Concord with his mother upon her remarriage when Thomas was about eight years old.

He was engaged in the early French and Indian Wars, as is evidenced by his petition to the General Court on 12 November 1703, claiming that

"he having, in 1690, been detatched into the service against the Indian enemy, was engaged in a bloody fight near Oyster River, New Hampshire, wherein Captain Noah Wiswell and divers others were slain or wounded, that he had then had his left arm broken and his right hand much shot, so that he endured great pain and narrowly escaped with his life; that he was thereby much disabled for labor and getting his livelihood; forced to sell what stock he had acquired before being wounded to maintain himself since, and that in the fight he was necessitated to leave and lose his arms with which he was well furnished at his own charge."

The court granted him £5.

After marrying, he settled in Marlborough in the early 1690's in the Indian Plantation in the north-easterly part of town on what was afterwards known as the Colonel Wesson, or Spurr, place. He purchased his holdings there from Edmund Rice (30 acres in 1694 for £8), John Fay and Nathan Brigham (30 acres in 1699 for £17) and William Ward, Thomas Howe, and Jonathan Forbush in later years. These five rights enable him to draw, at subsequent divisions, a great amount of land, so that he eventually owned between 500 and 700 acres. He also acquired additional lands in Marlborough and neighboring Shrewsbury when that town was founded.

He devoted most of his energies to business and the farming and management of his land holdings. However, he did act for Edmund Rice in relation to the Indian Lands in 1695, was a signer in opposition to the settlement of Rev. Mr. Emerson in about 1702, was once a selectman, and served on various town and church committees. His was one of the defensive Garrison houses set up during the French and Indian Wars about 1710; the families of John Forbush, John Wheeler, Josiah Howe, and B(artholemew?) and James Carly were protected by this garrision.

An English publication had this notice of his death. "Died at Marlborugh, New England, in the 95th year of his age, Mr. Thomas Hapgood. His posterity were very numerous; viz., 9 children; 92 grand-children; 208 great grand-children; and four great-great grand-children, in all, 313. His grand-children saw their grand-children, and their grand-father at the same time." Thomas left a very detailed will transcribed in the cited Hapgood Genealogy. His estate, exclusive of indoor movables, was inventoried at £533 2s 3d. He had also, in his lifetime, given farms to each of his three sons.  
Thomas Hapgood
 
135 Ancestral File Number: 1G98-0C9 Sarah HATCH
 
136 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
137 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
138 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
139 JAMISON FAMILY
Posted by: Biography (IP Logged)
Date: December 25, 1999 07:21PM

JAMISON FAMILY. Robert S. Jamison was born near Greensburg,
Pennsylvania, July 13, 1835, and died March 14, 1903, at Redlands,
California, where he had gone a few weeks before on account of ill health.
In his youth he received a fair common school education, and having been
reared on the farm became a land-holder almost as soon as he was of legal
age. Although devoting much time to other pursuits, he was a farmer all
his life, and was a leader in scientific methods for improving the land,
using labor-saving machinery and introducing new and better strains of live
stock. He took an active part in establishing the Westmoreland Agricultural
Society, being its president for a number of years. In early manhood his
mind was attracted to the growing importance of the coal and coke industry
of western Pennsylvania. With keen foresight of the needs of the future, he
began to study the coal basins of his own locality. In 1880, associating
himself with others, he began buying coal lands extensively in Westmoreland
county and continued to do so for more than twenty years, and time has amply
proved the wisdom of these ventures. All the properties purchased by him
have become incorporated into large and flourishing industries. At the time
of his death he was president and large owner of the coal and coke company
that bears his name. In private life has was genial, fair, uniformly
courteous and charitable. He was a member of the Second Reformed Church in
Greensburg, and one of its officers of many years. He married Caroline
Wible, also native to Greensburg, who died May 24, 1905. Both are buried in
St. Clair cemetery. The names of their ten children are: Mary Emma died
1877; William W., Joseph Henry, di1.ed 1865; John M., Thomas S., Charles M.,
Robert S., Hugh D. Richard H., and Jay C. Jamison.
The family history in this country begins with Francis Jamison, SR., who
with his wife, four sons and two daughters emigrated from the north of
Ireland in 1764, and settled in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. His children
were: John, Robert, Margaret, Roseanne. Marmaduke, and Francis. Mr. and
Mrs. Francis Jamison, Sr., lived to a ripe old age, and both died while on a
visit to their children in Westmoreland county and are buried at Ridge
Church.
II. John Jamison (1749-1819) came to Westmoreland county in 1769 with
his brother Robert, and each took patent to about three hundred acres of
land. Robert Jamison located in Unity township, and his grandson, Joseph
Jamison, owns and still lives at the old homestead. John Jamison located in
Hempfield township, and after remaining for more than one hundred years in
his family the land is now owned by the Westmoreland Water Company, the
present reservior covering the site of the original buildings. In 1774 John
Jamison married Janet Martin*, daughter of John Martin, of Big Cove, Fulton
county, Pennsylvania. She was a sister of Hugh Martin, who also came to
Westmoreland county about that time. The children of Mr. & Mrs. John
Jamison were: Francis, John, Hugh, Robert, Benjamin, James, Margaret,
Janet, Mary, and Martha. Hugh and James inherited the old homestead and
spent their lives upon it.
III. Hugh Jamison (1785-1873), father of Robert S. Jamison, married
Jane Stuart in 1817. A farmer by occupation, he taught for many winters in
the public schools near his home. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. His
children were: John *1818-1902), Daniel Stuart (1822-1891), Hugh Martin,
now living in the state of Texas; Margaret J., now living in Greensburg, and
Robert S. Jamison (1835-1903).
"Source Pages 37 & 38 History of Westmoreland County, Volume II Pennsylvania
by
John N. Boucher New York, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1906
Transcribed June 9, 1999 by Marilynn Wienke for the Westmoreland County
History Project
Published 1999 by the Westmoreland County Pennsylvania Genealogy Project"
Martha Jamison [7]. 
John Jamison
 
140 JAMISON FAMILY
Posted by: Biography (IP Logged)
Date: December 25, 1999 07:21PM

JAMISON FAMILY. Robert S. Jamison was born near Greensburg,
Pennsylvania, July 13, 1835, and died March 14, 1903, at Redlands,
California, where he had gone a few weeks before on account of ill health.
In his youth he received a fair common school education, and having been
reared on the farm became a land-holder almost as soon as he was of legal
age. Although devoting much time to other pursuits, he was a farmer all
his life, and was a leader in scientific methods for improving the land,
using labor-saving machinery and introducing new and better strains of live
stock. He took an active part in establishing the Westmoreland Agricultural
Society, being its president for a number of years. In early manhood his
mind was attracted to the growing importance of the coal and coke industry
of western Pennsylvania. With keen foresight of the needs of the future, he
began to study the coal basins of his own locality. In 1880, associating
himself with others, he began buying coal lands extensively in Westmoreland
county and continued to do so for more than twenty years, and time has amply
proved the wisdom of these ventures. All the properties purchased by him
have become incorporated into large and flourishing industries. At the time
of his death he was president and large owner of the coal and coke company
that bears his name. In private life has was genial, fair, uniformly
courteous and charitable. He was a member of the Second Reformed Church in
Greensburg, and one of its officers of many years. He married Caroline
Wible, also native to Greensburg, who died May 24, 1905. Both are buried in
St. Clair cemetery. The names of their ten children are: Mary Emma died
1877; William W., Joseph Henry, died 1865; John M., Thomas S., Charles M.,
Robert S., Hugh D. Richard H., and Jay C. Jamison.
The family history in this country begins with Francis Jamison, SR., who
with his wife, four sons and two daughters emigrated from the north of
Ireland in 1764, and settled in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. His children
were: John, Robert, Margaret, Roseanne. Marmaduke, and Francis. Mr. and
Mrs. Francis Jamison, Sr., lived to a ripe old age, and both died while on a
visit to their children in Westmoreland county and are buried at Ridge
Church.
II. John Jamison (1749-1819) came to Westmoreland county in 1769 with
his brother Robert, and each took patent to about three hundred acres of
land. Robert Jamison located in Unity township, and his grandson, Joseph
Jamison, owns and still lives at the old homestead. John Jamison located in
Hempfield township, and after remaining for more than one hundred years in
his family the land is now owned by the Westmoreland Water Company, the
present reservior covering the site of the original buildings. In 1774 John
Jamison married Janet Martin*, daughter of John Martin, of Big Cove, Fulton
county, Pennsylvania. She was a sister of Hugh Martin, who also came to
Westmoreland county about that time. The children of Mr. & Mrs. John
Jamison were: Francis, John, Hugh, Robert, Benjamin, James, Margaret,
Janet, Mary, and Martha. Hugh and James inherited the old homestead and
spent their lives upon it.
III. Hugh Jamison (1785-1873), father of Robert S. Jamison, married
Jane Stuart in 1817. A farmer by occupation, he taught for many winters in
the public schools near his home. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. His
children were: John *1818-1902), Daniel Stuart (1822-1891), Hugh Martin,
now living in the state of Texas; Margaret J., now living in Greensburg, and
Robert S. Jamison (1835-1903).
"Source Pages 37 & 38 History of Westmoreland County, Volume II Pennsylvania
by
John N. Boucher New York, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1906
Transcribed June 9, 1999 by Marilynn Wienke for the Westmoreland County
History Project
Published 1999 by the Westmoreland County Pennsylvania Genealogy Project" 
Martha Jamison
 
141 Anne may have been born in Peru, N.Y. ANNE ELIZABETH JOY
 
142 Daniel may have been born in Peru, N.Y. DANIEL N. JOY
 
143 I BELIEVE OBEDIAH SR. REMARRIED MOLLY PARKER Obediah Joy
 
144 From "The Adventures of the Kettenring Family in America", but Louis Ketron:

"After teaching school for ten years, A.C. became a Methodist Minister. He was one of the last true circuit riders. He estimated that he had traveled over 295,000 miles by horseback, buggy, and automobile in his ministry.

I remember Rev. Ketron from my childhood. He would periodically come home to Kingsley Methodist Church and preach. He was an impressive sight to a child with the patch he wore over one eye.

A.C. pastored over 100 churches in Holston Conference. That would approximate 1 of 10 Churchses he pastored in Holston. Rev. Ketron and his wife had three sons; Thomas, who died at age two, Hebron, and Carmel. His two daughters were named Mary, and one named Rachel." 
Albert Cornelius Ketron
 
145 Notes for Daniel Kettenring (later named Catron)
Added to Daniel Kettenring by bettyw1941 on 12 Mar 2007 (Betty Willoughby)
Daniel Catron was found in the 1840 Sullivan Co., Census with the following: 1 male - 60 - 70 (Daniel) 1 male - 20 - 30 1 male under 5 1 female - 40-50 2 females - 30 - 40 1 female - 20 - 30 2 females - 5 - 10 Daniel lived in Hawkins Co., Tennessee, just next door to Sullivan Co., for awhile. I have not been able to find exactly where his property was in Hawkins Co, but my theory is that he lived somewhere in the west Carters Valley area of Hawkins Co. All the of the Kettenring children, with the exception of Michael Jr., who stayed in Wythe Co. Va., lived in close proximity with each other. Often their land joined although they were in another state and county. Sullivan Co., Tennessee bordered, Hawkins Co, Tennessee, and Scott Co., Va, as well as Washington Co., Va., and all of the children at one time, lived in one of these four counties. Christian and Valentine left the area and moved west at a time later, and Elizabeth when in her 80s, long after her husband had died in Scott Co., Va, moved to Iowa to live with one of her sons. She died there in 07 Apr 1867, just before her 90th birthday. Daniel evidently had other children, but no record, to my knowledge, has been found of anyone other than Christopher Columbus Kettenring.  
Daniel Kettenring
 
146 The Kettenring family were landowners. They built entire villages; they were communtiy political leaders, and our eldest know ancestor, Johann Jacob Kettenring, Sr, was a Burgomeister of Landstul, still a substantial town in the Pfalz (and presently the home to that huge American Army hospital serving our military battle casualties). His grandfather had been the last of the minor nobles -- the von Kettenrings --- who owned a castle and had lands in Wurttemburg given to them in 1400 by the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf IV, the Duke Palatine. The obviously were on the losing side in the ill-fated Knights’ War of the 1520s that pitted the nobility against the clergy. The last noble von Kettenring probably died at the Battle of Schloss Nanstein, a castle overlooking Landsthul from the Hohe Hohengrin, a ridge rising sharply from the plain below.

The Kettenrings originally had come down the Rhein River from Switzerland in the 1380s as allies of Duke Rupert against the hated Austrian Hapburgs. I have searched unsuccessfully to find our ancestral family home in Switzerland, but it most assuredly was in either Schwyz or Uri cantons, as our earlier blacksmithing forbears invented a very durable chain mail for battle that gave us our famly name of Kettenring. They most probably served in the battles against the Austrian Hapsburgs at Sempach, Nafels, or Morgarten, going back to 1314.

However, it should be noted that they became religious dissidents in post-Luther Germany, subscribing to neither the Catholic nor Lutheran creeds. For a hundred years the Pfalz was the sole area in middle Europe that maintained its religious freedom from both of those dictatorial denominations; the Thirty Years War from 1618-1648 (actually not concluded until 1655) and the dissolution of the independent Duchy of the Palatinate and subsequent domination by the French created intolerable religious persecution. William Penn began coming to this region in the 1680s urging free-thinking German religious dissidents to resettle in his new Quaker colony of Pennsylvania, where he promised religious toleration for all. 
Hans Jacob Kettenring
 
147 Johann Adam Kettenring was killed in 1702 after sending his family to safety at his in-laws home village of Lemberg southeast of Pirmasens. The urge to leave grew, and J. Adam’s eldest sone migrated to Pennsylvania in 1727 with his family. He and later his son became the largest landowner in Lancaster County... or at least they paid more land tax than anyone else. The land tax records are in the Pennsylvania State archives in Harrisburg. Additionally, each succeeding wave of Kettenrings arriving in America seemed to go first to the family homestead west of Annville, which now is in Lebanon County. There is no modern sign of the family homestead migrated southward into the Shenandoah Valley or west first to Kentucky and Tennessee and later to Ohio, Illinois and Missouri. Johann Adam Kettenring
 
148 from an e-mail from Robert Ketron:

J. Valentine’s and J. Michael’s father was Johann Balthasar (1694-1746), who along with his cousin Christoff built the 30 houses of Salzwoog village, deep in the Pfalzwald (Pfalz Forest) to be as far from the ancestral home in Landstuhl as possible, as his father, Johann Adam, was killed by the invading French army in 1702 because he was the Burgomeister, or town mayor, as had been his fathers for generations before them. I have visited this village and have seen the home that Johann Balthasar build and in which Johann Michael and Johann Valentine were born. It is a sturdy, beautiful home still lived in today. 
Johann Balthasar Kettenring
 
149 According to Betty Bishop Willoughby, a Ketternring researcher, Johann Michael was a stocking-weaver.

From Robert Ketron:

. Michael came to America in 1765; I know the name of the ship and the date she arrived in Philadelphia. Your ancestor must have come about the same time as other relatives in 1837 (including the grandfather of Charles Franklin Kettering, our most esteemed relative), I am certain that my 4G came with his first cousin as a lark because one of their older cousins decided to emigrate with his entire family. I have no idea why yours did other that they were about the same age (28) and single. Bothe married American girls of German descent within a short period. 
Johann Michael Kettenring
 
150 "Longs Cemetery" is also known by the name "South Annville Cemetery" Amanda Kettering
 

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